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Why does the exception raised in foo whizz by unnoticed, but the exception raised in bar is thrown?

def foo():
    try:
        raise StandardError('foo')
    finally:
        return

def bar():
    try:
        raise StandardError('bar')
    finally:
        pass

foo()
bar()
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4  
duplicate of return eats exception –  gecco Dec 20 '11 at 12:04

1 Answer 1

up vote 15 down vote accepted

From the Python documentation:

If the finally clause raises another exception or executes a return or break statement, the saved exception is lost.

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1  
interesting! where does it 'go', if that question even makes sense? –  wim Dec 20 '11 at 12:33
5  
@wim: It goes wherever local variables go at the end of the function, I suppose. One way to look at it is that the exception is re-raised at the end of the finally block. Since the return skips the rest of the finally block, re-raising the exception never happens. –  interjay Dec 20 '11 at 12:46

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