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I'm using the command line to execute my php scripts instead of executing them in the browser, so I can look for errors a bit quicker. For browser there are some auto-refresh applications/plugins, so you don't have to hit CMD+R all the time.

For my error log I can use the tail -f command, but sure enough it doesn't execute/compile, so I can't use it for php files in the command-line.

Is there some equivalent or any work-around for compiled php-files ? Would be even greater to only output something in case of an error (native php-error like warnings, notices)!

Working on mac os/x if that's somehow helpful.

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You can tail -f the error log (enable PHP to log all errors, warnings, notices into a file, tail & follow it). Otherwise work with a terminal/shell and just press the up arrow key and you'll have the last command you can then fire-up again. Probably ctrl+r works to search the history of commands as well under OSX. –  hakre Dec 20 '11 at 12:04
    
tail -f the error log, should have thought about that! @hakre you're the best, period! Be great if you could enter this solution as an answer, guess thats the best recommendation for such scenarios! –  Anonymous Dec 20 '11 at 12:22
    
Added an answer with some other thing which might be interesting for you. I use something like that on my linux box. –  hakre Dec 20 '11 at 12:38
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can tail -f the error log (enable PHP to log all errors, warnings, notices into a file, tail & follow it).

Also checkout notification scripts which will create a bubble if something happens, e.g. something like How to get a pop up notification of a PHP error.

Otherwise work with a terminal/shell and just press the up arrow key and you'll have the last command you can then fire-up again. Probably ctrl+r works to search the history of commands as well under OSX.

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Great hakre, can't emphasize how I love your solution because of simplicity. Control+R works, and Control+C terminates the tail in case someone else needs to know! –  Anonymous Dec 20 '11 at 13:11
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The watch command does what you want.

watch - execute a program periodically, showing output fullscreen

You can do something like:

watch php myscript.php

and it would execute that command every two seconds and report it's output.

It even has flags to highlight differences from previous output.

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tried that already as I saw it somewhere, but somehow my os x terminal returns command not found :( –  Anonymous Dec 20 '11 at 12:10
    
Look at the link, it's not installed by default on OSX. –  Ikke Dec 20 '11 at 12:11
    
Got it, thanks. Going with hakre's solution though, just the best! Thanks anyway! –  Anonymous Dec 20 '11 at 12:13
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Combine with OSX command :-

while [ 1 ]
do
   php -r THE_FILE | grep -Ei "notice|warning|error"
   sleep 5
done
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Wicked, just what I needed! Btw can you also explain how to stop the loop ? –  Anonymous Dec 20 '11 at 12:10
    
ctrl + c will kill the loop. You can use the watch but you need to install into mac, unix.stackexchange.com/questions/10646/… –  ajreal Dec 20 '11 at 12:11
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