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I was working on a branch for the past few days and when I merged it and tried to push it I've been getting errors like these, can anyone shed any light on this

when pushing:

To git@github.com:****************/88888888888888888.git
 ! [rejected]        master -> master (non-fast-forward)
error: failed to push some refs to 'git@github.com:****************/88888888888888888.git'
To prevent you from losing history, non-fast-forward updates were rejected
Merge the remote changes (e.g. 'git pull') before pushing again.  See the
'Note about fast-forwards' section of 'git push --help' for details.

when fetching

    error: unable to resolve reference refs/remotes/origin/wishlist: No error
From github.com:****************/88888888888888888
 ! [new branch]      wishlist   -> origin/wishlist  (unable to update local ref)
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Make sure your local branch has everything committed that you want to keep. Try resetting any files that you do not want to keep, then do a pull. –  Joe Philllips Dec 20 '11 at 13:18

1 Answer 1

About your pushing issue, GitHub states

Dealing with “non-fast-forward” errors

From time to time you may encounter this error while pushing:

 $ git push origin master To ../remote/  ! [rejected]
 master -> master (non-fast forward)    error: failed to push some refs to '../remote/' 

 To prevent you from losing history, non-fast-forward
 updates were rejected Merge the remote changes before pushing again. 
 See the 'non-fast forward' section of 'git push --help' for details.

This error can be a bit overwhelming at first, do not fear. Simply put, git cannot make the change on the remote without losing commits, so it refuses the push. Usually this is caused by another user pushing to the same branch. You can remedy this by fetching and merging the remote branch, or using pull to perform both at once.

In other cases this error is a result of destructive changes made locally by using commands like git commit --amend or git rebase. While you can override the remote by adding --force to the push command, you should only do so if you are absolutely certain this is what you want to do. Force-pushes can cause issues for other users that have fetched the remote branch, and is considered bad practice. When in doubt, don’t force-push.


About the fetching issue, can you provide more information by using the verbose mode in the following command (replacing origin by the name of your remote)?

git fetch -v origin

EDIT:

I've just cloned your GitHub repo without a problem. Your local repo might be slightly corrupted. Without a copy of your local config, packed-refs files, logs and refs folders, it may be quite tricky to troubleshoot remotely.

However, there's an easy way to fix the fetching issue. Clone a fresh new version of your GitHub repository, in a different local folder, and re-start from there. This would reset your references and eliminate your issue.

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This is what I get when i run git fetch -v origin. From github.com:***/Street_Heart_Project = [up to date] productImage -> origin/productImage = [up to date] search -> origin/search = [up to date] securityc -> origin/securityc = [up to date] thankyou -> origin/thankyou = [up to date] welcomePage -> origin/welcomePage error: unable to resolve reference refs/remotes/origin/wishlist: No error ! [new branch] wishlist -> origin/wishlist (unable to update local ref) –  Danny Connolly Dec 20 '11 at 16:29
    
@DannyConnolly Did this provide you with any help? –  nulltoken Dec 21 '11 at 6:17
    
Not really, I don't need the branch anymore as it was already merged with the master, could I just delete it? –  Danny Connolly Dec 21 '11 at 14:05
    
If you've successfully merged it locally, you could indeed remove your tracking branch. As it still exists on the server, next time you'll fetch, git will try to rebuild it. If you're lucky the problem might have resolved. If that's not the case, I'd recommend to fresh clone and apply patches from your corrupted local repo to your new one, push the resulting commits from your new one, then drop the old one. –  nulltoken Dec 21 '11 at 14:38
    
Thanks for that i'll try that –  Danny Connolly Dec 22 '11 at 14:27

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