Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In C# when I want to call a static method of a class from another static method of that class, is there a generic prefix that I can use such as PHP's self:: instead of the class name?

So in the below example, instead of saying Customer.DatabaseConnectionExists(), how can I say something like Self.DatabaseConnectionExists() so e.g. later if I change the name of the class I don't have to go change all the prefixes?

class Customer
{
    public string FirstName { get; set; }
    public string LastName { get; set; }

    public static Customer GetCurrentCustomer()
    {
        if (Customer.DatabaseConnectionExists())
        {
            return new Customer { FirstName = "Jim", LastName = "Smith" };
        }
        else
        {
            throw new Exception("Database connection does not exist.");
        }
    }

    public static bool DatabaseConnectionExists()
    {
        return true;
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
I'm not aware of anything, but why wouldn't you just go to "Refactor" through the context menu - it'll equally save you from manual edit woes –  annakata May 13 '09 at 12:08
    
right but at least from my experience reading PHP code, if you see "self::" you know you are referencing that class no matter what it is called, if you see "Customer::" you have to look around to see if you are indeed in the Customer class or not. It just makes code a little more explicit, something I was used to seeing. –  Edward Tanguay May 13 '09 at 12:18
add comment

5 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted

There's no real equivalent - you have to either specify the class name, i.e.

Customer.DatabaseConnectionExists()

or miss out the qualifier altogether, i.e.

DatabaseConnectionExists()

The latter style of calling is advisable since it's simpler and doesn't lose any meaning. Also, it's more inline with method calling in instances (i.e. calling by InstanceMethod() and not this.InstanceMethod(), which is overly verbose).

share|improve this answer
2  
I would think that it would make your code easier to read if you use "this." for instance methods and "ClassName." for static methods, otherwise you don't know by glancing at a method call if it is for an instance or static. Moving from PHP to C# I feel that I often have to look around in the context of the code to figure out this difference. –  Edward Tanguay May 13 '09 at 12:15
    
@Edward Tanguay: I can see why you might think this, but really it's just being too verbose (at least in my opinion). You will very rarely see methods called using this.MethodName(), just because it's against most design guidelines. The usage of this with fields and properties, on the other hands, varies quite widely. –  Noldorin May 13 '09 at 12:18
add comment

If you're calling the method from inside the class, you don't need to specify anything like ::Self, just the method name will do.

class Customer
{
    public string FirstName { get; set; }
    public string LastName { get; set; }

    public static Customer GetCurrentCustomer()
    {
        if (DatabaseConnectionExists())
        {
            return new Customer { FirstName = "Jim", LastName = "Smith" };
        }
        else
        {
            throw new Exception("Database connection does not exist.");
        }
    }

    public static bool DatabaseConnectionExists()
    {
        return true;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I was writing the same answer + the fact that we could use a refactor tool in case we want to change the name of the class. Personally, I use "Resharper" refactoring tool. –  Nordes May 13 '09 at 12:08
add comment

Just leave it out. DatabaseConnectionExists is defined inside the class.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Just call it without any prefix.

share|improve this answer
add comment

No, there isn´t. But with the refactor tools, changing a name of a class should not worry you too much.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.