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how to send an email address with delphi 2010 such as ( verefication email, password lost, or any html/plain text emails.

i tried with the following code but i get EIdSocket Eroor with message 'Socket Error #10060 Connection Timed Out' when trying to send the mail.

procedure TForm5.btnSendMailClick(Sender: TObject);
begin

//setup SMTP
smtppass := ed_IdVerification.Text;
SMTP.Host := 'smtp.google.com';   // Controle a distance
SMTP.Port := 465;
smtp.Username := 'hetallica69@gmail.com';
smtp.Password := QuotedStr(smtppass);


//setup mail message

MailMessage.From.Address := 'hetallica69@gmail.com';
MailMessage.Recipients.EMailAddresses := '_rafik@live.fr';

MailMessage.Subject := 'Confirm your account';
MailMessage.Body.Text := 'Text goes here';

//send mail
try
 try
   if not smtp.Connected then SMTP.Connect() ;
   SMTP.Send(MailMessage) ;
 except on E:Exception do
   ShowMessage(E.Message);
 end;
   finally
     if SMTP.Connected then SMTP.Disconnect;
   end;
end;
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I am not asking how to send anonymous or phishing email but i am wondering to know how to Use the SMTP component using delphi, i need to send verification email whenever a new user signups –  Rafik Bari Dec 20 '11 at 14:15
3  
What error do you get? A compiler error? A runtime error? Timed out is not a compiler error. Your question is vague and unanswerable, and missing many details about your actual error. Besides, your original version of your code that you posted before you edited it makes you seem like a Phisher, however much you edit this post. –  Warren P Dec 20 '11 at 14:39
2  
Have you seen Send mail to GMail using Indy ? –  mjn Dec 20 '11 at 14:45
    
The project splash_screen.exe triggered an exception class EIdSocket Eroor with message 'Socket Error #10060 Connection Timed Out' –  Rafik Bari Dec 20 '11 at 14:51
1  
possible duplicate of How to send e-mail using gmail's smtp and Indy 10? –  Ken White Dec 20 '11 at 15:08
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1 Answer

The error that you are receiving means that the connection is failing on this line: SMTP.Connect().

Usually, it means the port is wrong, the server is not up, or you don't have connectivity.

In this case, you don't have connectivity, most likely because your ISP is blocking connection to that remote port.

Try sending the email from your hosted web server.

Even if you could connect, your code won't work as is. Port 465 on Google's SMTP server requires a secure (SSL) connection. You'll still need to implement that. Take a look at: How do I send e-mail using Gmail's SMTP and Indy 10?

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1  
This is wrong. It's failing because gmail uses a secure connection, and the poster hasn't. It has nothing to do with connectivity or server status. (gmail isn't in the habit of going down very often.) Read the comments to the original question, and follow either of the links provided in them. :) You might want to delete this answer before the downvotes start. Note: I'm not downvoting. –  Ken White Dec 20 '11 at 18:49
    
Ken, I'm not wrong. If the connection was secure, it would at least connect. TLS and SSL "Secure connections" are above the TCP layer. I can't connect either because my ISP blocks. –  Marcus Adams Dec 20 '11 at 18:51
    
Um, no. :) I had issues with Thunderbird and configuring gmail SMTP when TB was first released, and I got connection timeout errors. gmail support helped me track it to the security part of the config,and once I got that straight the connection timeouts disappeared. So either the TLS settings resulted in connection timeouts, or gmail support decided to lie to me about gmail being down and hide it with TLS excuses. :) –  Ken White Dec 20 '11 at 21:29
    
I tried this at work. I get a EIdReadTimeout when I can connect, but I don't use TLS. I get a EIdConnectTimeout when I try to connect to the wrong port or a known blocked port. –  Marcus Adams Dec 21 '11 at 14:12
    
Ok. I'm not sure why the difference (unless Thunderbird just used a generic "timed out" message instead of notifying the specific type of timeout - just thought of that when I read your last comment). Glad I didn't downvote. :) I'd have to take it back. Still not sure you're right, but at least I can't say for sure you're wrong. ;) –  Ken White Dec 21 '11 at 16:31
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