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Let's say I have this code:

[HttpPost]
public ActionResult Edit(MyViewModel viewModel)
{
    if (ModelState.IsValid)
    {
        _myRepository.SaveStuff(viewModel.Property1, viewModel.Property2);
        return RedirectToAction("MyAction", "MyController");
    }
    else
    {
        return View("Edit", viewModel);
    }
}

This is ASP.NET MVC, but that's actually irrelevant for my question. The real point is that a method (SaveStuff) is called only when a requirement is met. Now I want to write unit tests for this method...

I test that the method in the repository is called and a RedirectToRoute is returned when the modelstate is valid. I test that a ViewResult is returned when the modelstate is invalid.

My question is, should I also write a test that makes sure that the method on the repository is not called when the modelstate is invalid? It seems like a good test to have to make sure that I don't get any unwanted saves. But I feel that if I go down that route, testing that things doesn't happen, the amount of tests I have to write increases very much...

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6 Answers 6

To answer your question, yes. You should definitely test that a method is not called when it shouldn't be called. You definitely don't want your application persisting invalid data.

You are also correct that the number of tests will increase if you break everything into a separate test. You tests can have multiple assertions though. I would combine the two assertions for when the state is invalid. That'll save you from writing a nearly identical test.

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1  
Just a personal opinion that sometimes several asserts in single test can make it harder to understand what the test is testing (name of the test) and why it has failed when it fails. –  Toni Parviainen Dec 21 '11 at 16:04
    
@ToniParviainen - The multiple asserts need to be related to a single condition. In this case, there are two things that should happen when the model state is invalid: 1) Nothing should be saved and 2) Appropriate view should be returned. Should definitely stay away from multiple asserts regarding different conditions. –  Justin Niessner Dec 21 '11 at 16:06

How many paths through the method are there?

Doesn't it make sense to test them all? Would it be an error to save it if the model state isn't valid?

The number of things to ensure don't happen is usually limited by the context of the method under test; it's significant that a model is not saved if it's invalid (I'm assuming).

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It would certainly be an error to save data if the model state is invalid. ModelState.IsValid in ASP.NET MVC contains the result of an input validation, so if it is false then the user has provided invalid input. –  haagel Dec 20 '11 at 14:33
    
@haagel It was a rhetorical question :) –  Dave Newton Dec 20 '11 at 14:34
    
Ah, sorry for the misunderstanding :P –  haagel Dec 20 '11 at 15:11

My question is, should I also write a test that makes sure that the method on the repository is not called when the modelstate is invalid? It seems like a good test to have to make sure that I don't get any unwanted saves. But I feel that if I go down that route, testing that things doesn't happen, the amount of tests I have to write increases very much...

My answer would generally be yes you should, but really the decision of what to test is yours. You should test anything that worries you.

In this instance, that only adds one test. It shouldn't add a lot.

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You want to test all of your code paths. If it truly won't ever happen then you don't even need the if statement right? I would expect you to write two tests for this method:

// Note: I don't do .NET, so pardon any basic errors
// and hopefully the intent shows through.

[SetUp]
public void SetUp()
{
   repository = new MockWidgetRepository()
   controller = new WidgetController(repository);
}

[Test]
public void savesValidWidgets() 
{
   var result = controller.Edit(new ValidViewModel());
   Assert.IsTrue(repository.SaveWasCalled());
   Assert.AreEqual(typeof(RedirectResult), result.GetType());
}

This represents the first case you mentioned. The second, however will be similar.

[Test]
public void InvalidWidgetsAreRedisplayed()
{
   var result = controller.Edit(new InvalidViewModel());
   Assert.AreEqual(typeof(ViewResult), result.GetType());
}

Hope that helps!

Brandon

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Yes, but the way I'd test it is to have two test cases, one valid and one invalid, and when you run each case record the sequence of saves called for by the code under test.

For each test case check that it results in the correct sequence of saves - which happens to be exactly one save (with the correct arguments) for the valid case, and exactly zero saves for the invalid case.

My general reason for this is that it's best where possible not to have different test code for each case that the code under test treats differently. If you have different test data running through the same test code, there's less chance that when you write your test code you'll mess up the same edge case that you messed up in the application code. So I try to structure as many tests as possible of a given function with common code in the form "put in this input and check that the output and side-effects are as expected". Hopefully you also end up with less test code this way, because you systematically test all side-effects for all the inputs, rather than writing separate code for each input.

If you're really lucky, you'll be able to add regression tests and new-feature tests in future just by adding test cases, without writing any new test code at all.

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Yes you should test that _repository.SaveStuff is not called. You actually have four tests that you need to write.

  1. if ModelState.IsValid = SaveStuff
  2. if Not ModelState.IsValid = do not SaveStuff
  3. if ModelState.IsValid = return RedirectToAction
  4. if Not ModelState.IsValid = return View

If as stated in your question, you test that SaveStuff and RedirectAction together you will have a brittle test.

The same equivelant code to show what is going on:

[HttpPost]
public ActionResult Edit(MyViewModel viewModel)
{
   if (ModelState.IsValid)
   {
       _myRepository.SaveStuff(viewModel.Property1, viewModel.Property2);
   }

   if (ModelState.IsValid)
   {
       return RedirectToAction("MyAction", "MyController");
   }

   return View("Edit", viewModel);
}
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