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Possible Duplicate:
Read/Write Python Closures

In the following function, the internal function does not modify the argument but just modifies the copy.

def func():
  i = 3
  def inc(i):
    i = i + 3
  print i
  inc(i)
  inc(i)
  print i

func()

Is it possible to avoid repeated code and put that inside a function in python? I tried the following too but it throws error UnboundLocalError: local variable 'i' referenced before assignment

def func():
  i = 3
  def inc():
    i = i + 3
  print i
  inc()
  inc()
  print i

func()
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marked as duplicate by delnan, Duncan, Michael J. Barber, Adam Wagner, Nate Dec 20 '11 at 15:58

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
It is one of my favorite interview questions. I suggest you read about variable visibility in Python. –  lig Dec 20 '11 at 15:41
    
possible duplicate of Read/Write Python Closures –  delnan Dec 20 '11 at 15:42
    
See also: stackoverflow.com/q/8447947/331473 –  Adam Wagner Dec 20 '11 at 15:57

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In python 3 you'd do this:

def func():
  i = 3
  def inc():
    nonlocal i
    i = i+3
  print(i)
  inc()
  inc()
  print(i)

func()

In python 2.x using global doesn't work because the variable is in an outer scope, but it's not global. Hence, you'll need to pass the variable as an argument.

This is the problem that PEP 3104 addresses.

share|improve this answer

what about:

def func():
    i = 3
    def inc(i):
        return i + 3
    print i
    i = inc(i)
    i = inc(i)
    print i

func()
share|improve this answer

In Python 3 you can use nonlocal.

>>> def func():
    i = 3
    def inc():
        nonlocal i
        i += 3
    print(i)
    inc()
    inc()
    print(i)

>>> func()
3
9
>>> 
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