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I was wondering which part of my code will free a dynamically allocated, but static class member when this is not needed anymore. See the following code: classPrinter is shared among all A-objects and created when the first instance of class A will be created. Just to be sure: the classPrinter-object will automatically be destructed when exiting my program, right?

a.h

class A {
static B* classPrinter;
}

a.cpp

#include "a.h"
B A::classPrinter = new B();

A::A() { ...}
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2  
Smart pointers are good for this kind of thing, at least if you really need dynamic allocation (see sbi's answer. –  Fred Larson Dec 20 '11 at 16:01
1  
Ack.... static pointer == evil. –  Lee Louviere Dec 20 '11 at 16:58

6 Answers 6

up vote 17 down vote accepted

Just to be sure: the somePrinter-object will automatically be destructed when exiting my program, right?

Since this is C++, the answer is "No." For everything allocated with new the corresponding delete must be called. If that doesn't happen, the object leaks. But why allocate this dynamically at all? This

class A {
  static B classPrinter;
}

B A::classPrinter;

behaves like your code, except that classPrinter will be destructed at the end of the program.

However, you write that

classPrinter is shared among all A-objects and created when the first instance of class A will be created.

The code in your question doesn't do this. If you want to do this, do something like this:

class A {
  static std::shared_ptr<B> classPrinter;
}

std::shared_ptr<B> A::classPrinter;

A::A()
{
  if(!classPrinter)
    classPrinter.reset(new B());
}

The smart pointer will make sure that the object gets deleted.

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1  
"is shared among all A-objects and created when the first instance of class A will be created" –  pezcode Dec 20 '11 at 16:03
    
@pezcode: I suppose you refer to "created when the first instance of class A will be created." I read that, but the code in the question does the same as my code (except for leaking, of course). –  sbi Dec 20 '11 at 16:06
    
may be new operator is overloaded, i think its not a case, but in theory its possible. –  Yola Dec 20 '11 at 16:07
    
after edit +1.. –  Yola Dec 20 '11 at 16:17
1  
Minor nit. After making classPrinter an object instead of a pointer, you say "this behaves like your code, except that classPrinter will be deleted at the end of the program." No, it won't be deleted, as it isn't a pointer, and no delete is called, but it will be destroyed (its destructor will run). –  Brian Neal Dec 20 '11 at 16:24

No, objects created using new are never automatically deleted. You should always provide a matching delete to prevent memory leaks.

In this case, the simplest solution would be to have a static object, rather than a static pointer to a dynamic object - there is no reason at all for the extra level of indirection.

// header file
class A {
    static B classPrinter;
};

// source file
B A::classPrinter;

or if you want to delay the construction until the object is needed (and avoid potential problems if static objects in other translation units need to access it from their constructors):

class A {
    static B & classPrinter() {
        static B instance;
        return instance;
    }
};

In other situations, when you actually need dynamic allocation, you should always manage the dynamic object using smart pointers or other RAII objects.

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1  
That local static is a nice trick I forgot to mention. +1 from me. –  sbi Dec 20 '11 at 16:54

The destructor of the object of which A::classPrinter points to will not be called.

If you think about it's nothing else but logic; where is the matching delete-statement that, in normal cases, would call the dtor of the object?

The memory occupied will be flagged as free again and returned to the system, at least in all modern such.

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@sbi I'm not sure if I had the chance to edit my post before or after your comment, but I did change the wording so it should be easier to understand. –  Filip Roséen - refp Dec 20 '11 at 16:00

If A::classPrinter is shared amongst multiple members, maybe use std::shared_ptr instead of a raw pointer? It will be automatically deleted after all references to it are gone.

But yes, the memory will be reclaimed after the program exits, at least on all OS's I can think of...

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You need to create some wrapper or use something like shared_ptr to guarantee dtor call.

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Static (as far as static member variable) inherently means, always exists.

If you make a static pointer, you simply cannot deallocate at a point that makes sense. You need more context.

If you want shared data that exists only while you have instances of static member owner class, then you need a static counter. Allocate a new static value whenever you create an instance and counter == 0. Deallocate the current static value whenever you delete the last instance of the owner class.

Otherwise, you'll have to dip into things like shared or smart pointers to deallocate, but even then you run into problems. If the smart pointer sees no more references and deallocates, it may do so too early. If it's in the deallocated state, then what does that mean when you need the information again. Do you allocate a new static value?

If the static member needs to always exist whether you have an instance of the owner class or not, you should consider changing the pointer into a reference or instance instead.

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