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I have found some very useful code:

RewriteEngine On
RewriteCond %{HTTP_HOST} ^www.example.com$ [NC]
RewriteRule ^(.*)$ http://example.com/$1 [R=301,L]

from another Stack Overflow post: Remove WWW prefix from your website.

I often re-use the same code on various sub-domains and sites so decided to rewrite a generalised version. I came up with the following:

RewriteEngine On
RewriteCond %{HTTP_HOST} ^www\.(.*) [NC]
RewriteRule ^(.*)$ http://%1/$1 [R=301,L]

It appears to work, but can anyone give me a reason why I should not use this? Have I missed an obvious flaw?

Edit: I am aware that removing the www has associated issues, but in this case I am more interested in problems arising from writing a generalised htaccess RewriteRule (rather than the actions of the rule itself)

Edit: Code edited as recommended by @ulrich

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I would also escape the. otherwise it would match www2.somedomain.com and your %1 would end up being .somedomain.com (if you had such a subdomain configured in the future)

RewriteCond %{HTTP_HOST} ^www\.(.*) [NC]

If you want to further limit it to just a .com you could use

RewriteCond %{HTTP_HOST} ^www\.(.+\.com)$ [NC]

or .net etc

RewriteCond %{HTTP_HOST} ^www\.(.+\.(com|net|edu))$ [NC]

You may also want to add a RewriteBase / after the RewriteEngine On in case you add other rules to your .htaccess later that need it.

Barring those cases, it should work as is.

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The answer lies in this word:

optimization

Here's a full explanation:

http://developer.yahoo.com/performance/rules.html#cookie_free

Quote:

When the browser makes a request for a static image and sends cookies together with the request, the server doesn't have any use for those cookies. So they only create network traffic for no good reason. You should make sure static components are requested with cookie-free requests. Create a subdomain and host all your static components there.

If your domain is www.example.org, you can host your static components on static.example.org. However, if you've already set cookies on the top-level domain example.org as opposed to www.example.org, then all the requests to static.example.org will include those cookies. In this case, you can buy a whole new domain, host your static components there, and keep this domain cookie-free. Yahoo! uses yimg.com, YouTube uses ytimg.com, Amazon uses images-amazon.com and so on.

The huge problem lies here: read carefully in bold:

if you don't have your www, all the cookies of your the domain will be sent to all the subdomains. I.e. your have 34 small images in your static.mondomain.com and your website is www.mondomain.com, you have 4 kb of cookies. No problem, all is fine. But if your website is mondomain.com without "www" then all those 4kb cookies will be sent to static.mondomain.com when downloading images, creating a huge and useless loss of bandwidth.

That's what I did when I wrote my version #1, then #2 of my framework. Hopefully my version#3 doesn't do this beginner's mistake, and I hope you'll avoid this too!


Long make short

I'm sorry my English is not very good. What I'm trying to say is: if you plan to have a domain name that does everything (web + images + pdf +... and son on) then use *www*. Otherwise don't use it. The yahoo link explains it better than me.

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Can you clarify for me, please? Is this an argument against the fact that the rule is generalised or only against what the rule is doing? I am aware of the issues with removing the www - I am more interested in any issues with the generalisation. –  jofitz Dec 22 '11 at 8:35
    
I'm sorry my English is not very good. What I'm trying to say is: if you plan to have a domain name that does everything (web + images + pdf +... and son on) then use www. Otherwise don't use it. The yahoo link explains it better than me. –  Olivier Pons Dec 22 '11 at 9:06

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