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So I want to apply a function over a matrix in R. This works really intuitively for simple functions:

> (function(x)x*x)(matrix(1:10, nrow=2))
 [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5]
[1,]    1    9   25   49   81
[2,]    4   16   36   64  100

...but clearly I don't understand all of its workings:

> m = (matrix(1:10, nrow=2))
> (function(x) if (x %% 3 == 0) { return(NA) } else { return(x+1) })(m)
     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5]
[1,]    2    4    6    8   10
[2,]    3    5    7    9   11
Warning message:
In if (x == 3) { :
  the condition has length > 1 and only the first element will be used

I read up on this and found out about Vectorize and sapply, which both seemed great and just like what I wanted, except that both of them convert my matrix into a list:

> y = (function(x) if (x %% 3 == 0) { return(NA) } else { return(x+1) })
> sapply(m, y)
 [1]  2  3 NA  5  6 NA  8  9 NA 11
> Vectorize(y)(m)
 [1]  2  3 NA  5  6 NA  8  9 NA 11

...whereas I'd like to keep it in a matrix with its current dimensions. How might I do this? Thanks!

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Also check out this useful post on the different versions of apply: nsaunders.wordpress.com/2010/08/20/… –  patrickmdnet Dec 20 '11 at 17:36

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

@Joshua Ulrich (and Dason) has a great answer. And doing it directly without the function y is the best solution. But if you really need to call a function, you can make it faster using vapply. It produces a vector without dimensions (as sapply, but faster), but then you can add them back using structure:

# Your function (optimized)
y = function(x) if (x %% 3) x+1 else NA

m <- matrix(1:1e6,1e3)
system.time( r1 <- apply(m,1:2,y) ) # 4.89 secs
system.time( r2 <- structure(sapply(m, y), dim=dim(m)) ) # 2.89 secs
system.time( r3 <- structure(vapply(m, y, numeric(1)), dim=dim(m)) ) # 1.66 secs
identical(r1, r2) # TRUE
identical(r1, r3) # TRUE

...As you can see, the vapply approach is about 3x faster than apply... And the reason vapply is faster than sapply is that sapply must analyse the result to figure out that it can be simplified to a numeric vector. With vapply, you specified the result type (numeric(1)), so it doesn't have to guess...

UPDATE I figured out another (shorter) way of preserving the matrix structure:

m <- matrix(1:10, nrow=2)
m[] <- vapply(m, y, numeric(1))

You simply assign the new values to the object using m[] <-. Then all other attributes are preserved (like dim, dimnames, class etc).

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Thanks very much for this. I agree in retrospect that with the toy example I gave skipping the actual function was the right call, but I really wanted to know how this should be handled when it is actually a function. (I tried to contrive one to that effect that was simpler than the one I was really dealing with, but evidently missed the mark.) Anyway having the timing information is super helpful because I am trying to optimize this as well -- thanks! –  Paul Eastlund Dec 20 '11 at 17:41

One way is to use apply on both rows and columns:

apply(m,1:2,y)
     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5]
[1,]    2   NA    6    8   NA
[2,]    3    5   NA    9   11

You can also do it with subscripting because == is already vectorized:

m[m %% 3 == 0] <- NA
m <- m+1
m
     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5]
[1,]    2   NA    6    8   NA
[2,]    3    5   NA    9   11
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For this specific example you can just do something like this

> # Create some fake data
> mat <- matrix(1:16, 4, 4)
> # Set all elements divisible by 3 to NA
> mat[mat %% 3 == 0] <- NA
> # Add 1 to all non NA elements
> mat <- mat + 1
> mat
     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4]
[1,]    2    6   NA   14
[2,]    3   NA   11   15
[3,]   NA    8   12   NA
[4,]    5    9   NA   17
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A coworker pointed this approach out to me. It does fulfill my need and I appreciate it, but it really seems like there should be some way to apply a pre-existing function over a matrix. –  Paul Eastlund Dec 20 '11 at 17:37

There's a slight refinement of Dason and Josh's solution using ifelse.

mat <- matrix(1:16, 4, 4)
ifelse(mat %% 3 == 0, NA, mat + 1)
     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4]
[1,]    2    6   NA   14
[2,]    3   NA   11   15
[3,]   NA    8   12   NA
[4,]    5    9   NA   17
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Nice one. this would be the fastest. a quick check using rbenchmark shows that it is around 8x faster than the vapply solution. Vectorization always triumpsh!! –  Ramnath Dec 20 '11 at 19:51

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