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Why is GCC giving me this error ? What am I doing wrong here ?

 temp.c: In function main:
 temp.c:6: error: invalid operands to binary +

Code:

 main()
 {
     char *Address1,*Address2,*NewAddress;
     Address1= (char*)0x12;
     Address2= (char*)0x34;
     NewAddress = Address1+Address2;
 }
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You can't add pointers. Why would you ever want to? It does make sense to add a pointer and an offset, but not two pointers... –  Mooing Duck Dec 20 '11 at 17:32

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Why do you want to do that?

The C language forbids addition of two pointers. It only defines (with severe restrictions) the addition of a pointer and an integer.

Basically, you can only add to a pointer an integer small enough so that the result was inside, or at the ending border, of some allocated memory zone.

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I thought its up to the user to make sure that addresses wont peep out of allocated space. Why is C imposing this restriction ? –  Jean Dec 20 '11 at 17:47
    
The C language standard says -in more politically correct words- that if a pointer "points nowhere", the behavior is undefined. And undefined behavior means really anything: exploding the computer is a valid implementation of undefined behavior. –  Basile Starynkevitch Dec 20 '11 at 18:00

C does not permit adding two pointers. The best explanation I found for this, not touching any standard, is Rouben Rostamian's quote:

If you and I live on the same street, the difference of our house numbers is some sort of indication of the distance between our houses.

Now, you tell me, what meaning is there in the sum of our house numbers?

So the whole operation does not make any sense. It is pretty logical, isn't it? You can do this, however:

NewAddress = (char *)(0x12 + 0x34);
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You can't add pointers together, that would be nonsensical.

What is allowed is adding integral values to pointers:

char *Address1,*NewAddress;
unsigned Offest;
     Address1= (char*)0x12;
     Offset= 0x34;
     NewAddress = Address1+Offset
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In C, you can't add two pointers. If you think about it, it doesn't logically make any sense to try. To fix this, you can cast one of the pointers to an integral value before adding:

NewAddress = (long)Address1 + Address2;
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Because those variables are pointers, try convert to int.

NewAddress = (char *)((int)Address1 + (int)Address2);
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