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Say we have these two Runnables:

class R1 implements Runnable {
    public void run() {...}
    ...
}

class R2 implements Runnable {
    public void run() {...}
    ...
}

Then what's the difference between this:

public class Foo {
    public static void main() {
        R1 r1 = new R1();
        R2 r2 = new R2();

        r1.run();
        r2.run();
    }
}

And this:

public class Foo {
    public static void main() {
        R1 r1 = new R1();
        R2 r2 = new R2();

        Thread t1 = new Thread(r1);
        Thread t2 = new Thread(r2);

        t1.start();
        t2.start();
    }
}

[Now I have to write some more text because it says that "my post does not have much context to explain the code sections"].

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1  
You cann't extend Runnable, Runnable is always implemented.It's an interface. –  nIcE cOw Dec 20 '11 at 17:53
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7 Answers 7

up vote 60 down vote accepted

First example: No multiple threads. Both execute in single (existing) thread. No thread creation.

R1 r1 = new R1();
R2 r2 = new R2();

r1 and r2 are just two different objects of the class that implements the Runnable interfaces which have that run() method. When you call r1.run() you are executing it in the current thread.

Second example: Two separate threads.

Thread t1 = new Thread(r1);
Thread t2 = new Thread(r2);

t1 and t2 are the objects of the class Thread. When you call t1.start(), it starts a new thread and calls the run() method of r1 internally to execute it within that new thread.

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5  
nice answer.. +1 –  StinePike May 28 '13 at 9:37
    
short yet great answer –  MBH Jul 14 at 22:59
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If you just invoke run() directly, it's executed on the calling thread, just like any other method call. Thread.start() is required to actually create a new thread so that the runnable's run method is executed in parallel.

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Thread.start() code registers the Thread with scheduler and the scheduler calls the run() method. Also, Thread is class while Runnable is an interface.

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Actually thread.start() creates a new thread and have its own execution scenario. thread.start() calls the run method asyc.when come to running state.

but thread.run() not creating any new thread, instead it execute the run method in the current running thread.

So guys if you are using thread.run() then think that what is the use of multi-threading if you want only one thread execute all run method.

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If you do run() in main method, the thread of main method will run the run method instead of the thread you require to run.

The start() method creates new thread and for which the run() method has to be done

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The 'main method' has nothing to do with it. –  EJP Oct 28 '13 at 9:25
    
@EJP, by main the writer meant the calling method. His answer is quite good. +1 ;-) –  dom_beau Mar 7 at 13:46
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In the first case you are just invoking the run() function of the r1 adn r2 objects.

In the second case you're actually creating 2 new Threads! ;) start() will call run() at same point!

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4  
Actually, start() won't call run(): if it did, then the run() method would get executed by the same thread that called start(). What start() will do is create a thread which will call the run() method. –  Bruno Reis Dec 22 '11 at 4:44
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The difference is that Thread.start() starts a thread, while Runnable.run() just calls a method.

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4  
Why would an 80k user give an answer like this two years after way better answers have been given and accepted? –  Sebastian Oct 28 '13 at 9:39
    
@Sebastian I don't accept your hypothesis. Specifically, the accepted answer is verbose and poor quality, and I don't see any other answers expressed better than this one. –  EJP Nov 1 '13 at 23:28
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