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I'm trying to declare an array with a custom class. When I added a constructor to the class, my compiler complains that there's "No matching constructor for initialization of name[3]".

Here's my program:

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

class name {
  public:
    string first;
    string last;

  name(string a, string b){
    first = a;
    last = b;
  }
};

int main (int argc, const char * argv[])
{

  const int howManyNames = 3;

  name someName[howManyNames];

  return 0;
}

What can I do to make this run, and what am I doing wrong?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You have to provide a default constructor. While you're at it, fix your other constructor, too:

class Name
{
public:
  Name() { }
  Name(string const & f, string const & l) : first(f), last(l) { }
  //...
};

Alternatively, you have to provide the initializers:

Name arr[3] { { "John", "Doe" }, { "Jane", "Smith" }, { "", "" } };

The latter is conceptually preferable, because there's no reason that your class should have a notion of a "default" state. In that case, you simply have to provide an appropriate initializer for every element of the array.

Objects in C++ can never be in an ill-defined state; if you think about this, everything should become very clear.


An alternative is to use a dynamic container, though this is different from what you asked for:

std::vector<Name> arr;
arr.reserve(3);  // morally "an uninitialized array", though it really isn't

arr.emplace_back("John", "Doe");
arr.emplace_back("Jane", "Smith");
arr.emplace_back("", "");

std::vector<Name> brr { { "ab", "cd" }, { "de", "fg" } }; // yet another way
share|improve this answer
    
PODs can be in an ill-defined state ;) –  FredOverflow Dec 20 '11 at 18:02
1  
@FredOverflow: They're not "ill-defined" - they're "uninitialized", which is conceptually well-defined, with the semantics that you mustn't read them. –  Kerrek SB Dec 20 '11 at 18:03
    
Okay so what would be an example of something that can be in an ill-defined state? –  FredOverflow Dec 20 '11 at 18:10
    
@FredOverflow: Well, as I said, you cannot do it in C++. Hypothetically it would be something like making a static array of "unconstructed" objects -- anything in which an object is not in a well-defined state (e.g. trying to address memory as a class-type object without having completed a constructor). Maybe the new unconstrained unions offer more examples; there's plenty of UB there if you don't run your own destructors in the right order; hinting at ways in which you're prohibited from driving into an ill-defined state. –  Kerrek SB Dec 20 '11 at 18:13
    
Er, resize requires a default constructible type. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Dec 20 '11 at 18:16

To default-initialize an array of Ts, T must be default constructible. Normally the compiler gives you a default constructor for free. However, since you declared a constructor yourself, the compiler does not generate a default constructor.

Your options:

  • add a default constructor to name, if that makes sense (I don't think so, but I don't know the problem domain);
  • initialize all the elements of the array upon declaration (you can do this because name is an aggregate);

      name someName[4] = { { "Arthur", "Dent" },
                           { "Ford", "Prefect" },
                           { "Tricia", "McMillan" },
                           { "Zaphod", "Beeblebrox" }
                         };
    
  • use a std::vector instead, and only add element when you have them constructed.

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you just need to add a default constructor to your class to look like this:

class name {
  public:
    string first;
    string last;

  name() {
  }

  name(string a, string b){
    first = a;
    last = b;
  }
};
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You need a parameterless constructor to be able to create an instance of your class. Your current constructor requires two input string parameters.

Normally C++ implies having such a constructor (=default parameterless constructor) if there is no other constructor declared. By declaring your first constructor with two parameters you overwrite this default behaviour and now you have to declare this constructor explicitly.

Here is the working code:

#include <iostream> 
#include <string>  // <-- you need this if you want to use string type

using namespace std; 

class name { 
  public: 
    string first; 
    string last; 

  name(string a, string b){ 
    first = a; 
    last = b; 

  }

  name ()  // <-- this is your explicit parameterless constructor
  {}

}; 

int main (int argc, const char * argv[]) 
{ 

  const int howManyNames = 3; 

  name someName[howManyNames]; 

  return 0; 
}

(BTW, you need to include to make the code compilable.)

An alternative way is to initialize your instances explicitly on declaration

  name someName[howManyNames] = { {"Ivan", "The Terrible"}, {"Catherine", "The Great"} };
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Your class:

class name {
  public:
    string first;
    string last;

  name() { }  //Default constructor.

  name(string a, string b){
    first = a;
    last = b;
  }
};

Has an explicit constructor that requires two string parameters. Classes with no constructor written explicitly get default constructors taking no parameters. Adding the explicit one stopped the compiler from generating that default constructor for you.

So, if you wish to make an array of uninitialized objects, add a default constructor to your class so the compiler knows how to create them without providing those two string parameters - see the commented line above.

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In order to create an array of objects, the objects need a constructor that doesn't take any paramters (that creates a default form of the object, eg. with both strings empty). This is what the error message means. The compiler automatically generates a constructor which creates an empty object unless there are any other constructors.

If it makes sense for the array elements to be created empty (in which case the members acquire their default values, in this case, empty strings), you should:

-Write an empty constructor:

class name {
  public:
    string first;
    string last;

  name() { }
  name(string a, string b){
    first = a;
    last = b;
  }
};

-Or, if you don't need it, remove the existing constructor.

If an "empty" version of your class makes no sense, there is no good solution to provide initialisation paramters to all the elements of the array at compile time. You can:

  • Have a constructor create an empty version of the class anyway, and an init() function which does the real initialisation
  • Use a vector, and on initialisation create the objects and insert them into the vector, either using vector::insert or a loop, and trust that not doing it at compile time doesn't matter.
  • If the object can't be copied either, you can use an array/vector of smart pointers to the object and allocate them on initialisation.
  • If you can use C++11 I think (?) you can use initialiser lists to initialise a vector and intialise it (I'm not sure if that works with any contructor or only if the object is created from a single value of another type). Eg: .
 std::vector<std::string> v = { "xyzzy", "plugh", "abracadabra" };

`

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