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I'm writing some C# .net code that saves some values to the registry. It worked fine up until I wanted to save some binary data.

I have a List<MyType> object where MyType looks like this:

[Serializable] public class MyType
{
 public string s {get;set;}
 public string t {get;set;}
}

I get an error with the following code:

List<MyType> objectToSaveInRegistry = getList();
RegistryKey registryKey = Registry.LocalMachine.OpenSubKey(MySpecialKey, true);
registryKey.SetValue("MySpecialValueName", objectToSaveInRegistry , RegistryValueKind.Binary);

The error is: "The type of the value object did not match the specified Registry ValueKind or the object could not be properly converted."

What can I do so that I can save my object in the registry?

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why do u want to save it in a registry.why not make it an xml file and save it. –  Srinivas Reddy Thatiparthy Dec 20 '11 at 17:58
1  
@Srinivas, my object contains information about the configuration of an application I'm developing. Isn't the Windows Registry meant to be a place where application settings can be saved? –  Daniel Allen Langdon Dec 20 '11 at 17:59
2  
You are trying to pass a List<MyType> to a method that is essentially expecting a byte array. You will need to convert your list to that kind of representation (either by serializing to a MemoryStream, or using a different serializer). –  Joe Dec 20 '11 at 18:03

4 Answers 4

up vote 13 down vote accepted

You probably need to serialize your object first with the help of the BinaryFormatter and store it in a byte array which you then can pass to SetValue. I doubt that SetValue will serialize the object for you.

Quick example:

using (var ms = new MemoryStream())
{
    var formatter = new BinaryFormatter();
    formatter.Serialize(ms, objectToSaveInRegistry);
    var data = ms.ToArray();
    registryKey.SetValue("MySpecialValueName", data, RegistryValueKind.Binary);
}
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Accepted +1: This is exactly what I was looking for! –  Daniel Allen Langdon Dec 20 '11 at 18:13
3  
@ChrisWue try this ms.WriteByte(1); Console.WriteLine(ms.GetBuffer().Length + " " + ms.ToArray().Length) Output: 256 1 –  L.B Dec 20 '11 at 18:19
    
@L.B: Good point, fixed –  ChrisWue Dec 20 '11 at 18:50

It's better to serialize/unserialize your object as a string. In the following example, I use XML serialization. The "value" variable is the list object to store in the registry.

// using Microsoft.Win32;
// using System.IO;
// using System.Text;
// using System.Xml.Serialization;

string objectToSaveInRegistry;

using(var stream=new MemoryStream())
{
    new XmlSerializer(value.GetType()).Serialize(stream, value);
    objectToSaveInRegistry=Encoding.UTF8.GetString(stream.ToArray());
}

var registryKey=Registry.LocalMachine.OpenSubKey("MySpecialKey", true);
registryKey.SetValue("MySpecialValueName", objectToSaveInRegistry, RegistryValueKind.String);
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I would store the primitive values and then hydrate a poco when the data is pulled opposed to storing the poco itself.

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What are you talking about? –  IllidanS4 Mar 8 at 19:04

Try change valueKind parameter to RegistryValueKind.String like this:

 List<MyType> objectToSaveInRegistry = getList();
 RegistryKey registryKey = Registry.LocalMachine.OpenSubKey(MySpecialKey, true);
 registryKey.SetValue("MySpecialValueName", objectToSaveInRegistry, RegistryValueKind.String);
share|improve this answer
1  
I don't imagine List<MyType> can be converted to string (especially a meaningful string) any more easily than it can be converted to the binary format expected by the OP. Have you tried this? –  Dan J Dec 20 '11 at 18:03
    
I did consider doing this, but I thought it seemed awfully kludgey to write my own code to serialize an object that consists of strings. I asked my question here because I was certain that there are features in the framework to do this for me. –  Daniel Allen Langdon Dec 20 '11 at 18:15

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