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How can I keep a ring of pixels around labeled regions in a numpy array?

In a simple case, I'd subtract the erosion. That approach doesn't work when the labels touch. How can I get get B from A?

A = array([[0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
           [0, 0, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 0, 0, 0],
           [0, 0, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 0, 0, 0],
           [0, 0, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 0, 0, 0],
           [0, 0, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 0, 0, 0],
           [0, 0, 2, 2, 2, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0],
           [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0],
           [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0],
           [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0],
           [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0],
           [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
           [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]])

B = array([[0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
           [0, 0, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 0, 0, 0],
           [0, 0, 2, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 2, 0, 0, 0],
           [0, 0, 2, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 2, 0, 0, 0],
           [0, 0, 2, 0, 0, 2, 2, 2, 2, 0, 0, 0],
           [0, 0, 2, 2, 2, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0],
           [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0],
           [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0],
           [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0],
           [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0],
           [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
           [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]])

I'm working with large arrays with many labels, so separate erosions on each label isn't an option.

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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

New Answer

Actually, I just thought of a better way:

B = A * (np.abs(scipy.ndimage.laplace(A)) > 0)

As a full example:

import numpy as np
import scipy.ndimage

A = np.array([[0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
              [0, 0, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 0, 0, 0],
              [0, 0, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 0, 0, 0],
              [0, 0, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 0, 0, 0],
              [0, 0, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 0, 0, 0],
              [0, 0, 2, 2, 2, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0],
              [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0],
              [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0],
              [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0],
              [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0],
              [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
              [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]])

B = A * (np.abs(scipy.ndimage.laplace(A)) > 0)

I think this should work in all cases (of "labeled" arrays like A, at any rate...).

If you're worried about performance, you can split this into a few pieces to reduce memory overhead:

B = scipy.ndimage.laplace(A)
B = np.abs(B, B) # Preform abs in-place
B /= B  # This will produce a divide by zero warning that you can safely ignore
B *= A  

This version is a lot more verbose, but should use much less memory.

Old Answer

I can't think of a good way to do it in one step with the usual scipy.ndimage functions. (I feel like a tophat filter should do what you want, but I can't quite figure it out.)

However, doing several separate erosions is an option, as you mentioned.

You should get reasonable performance even on very large arrays if you use find_objects to extract the subregion of each label, and then just do the erosion on the subregion.

For example:

import numpy as np
import scipy.ndimage

A = np.array([[0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
              [0, 0, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 0, 0, 0],
              [0, 0, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 0, 0, 0],
              [0, 0, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 0, 0, 0],
              [0, 0, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 0, 0, 0],
              [0, 0, 2, 2, 2, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0],
              [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0],
              [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0],
              [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0],
              [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0],
              [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
              [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]])

regions = scipy.ndimage.find_objects(A)

mask = np.zeros_like(A).astype(np.bool)

for val, region in enumerate(regions, start=1):
    if region is not None:
        subregion = A[region]
        mask[region] = scipy.ndimage.binary_erosion(subregion == val)

B = A.copy()
B[mask] = 0

This yields:

array([[0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
       [0, 0, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 0, 0, 0],
       [0, 0, 2, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 2, 0, 0, 0],
       [0, 0, 2, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 2, 0, 0, 0],
       [0, 0, 2, 0, 0, 2, 2, 2, 2, 0, 0, 0],
       [0, 0, 2, 2, 2, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0],
       [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0],
       [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0],
       [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0],
       [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0],
       [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
       [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]])

The performance should be reasonable for large arrays, but it's going to depend strongly on how large of an area the different labeled objects span and the number of labeled objects that you have....

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The label array is sparse, so this should work fine. I actually had the same thought on my way to work this morning... –  ajwood Dec 21 '11 at 14:13
    
Actually, I just thought of a better way. (Though the original answer may be faster in some circumstances...) See the edits. –  Joe Kington Dec 21 '11 at 16:24
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