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I am trying to input a date into an Oracle database. Sometime this value will be null. So in the function that I am writing I need a way to be able to pass in this null value. I am passing in this date as a parameter to stored proc. This parameter can be null. I am using the Oracle.DataAccess dll to get this thing to work. If it is indeed null, I am thinking of just throwing in a null variable. Do you think that would work??? Here is how I currently am setting up this scenario...

cmd.Parameters.Add("ACTIVE_DATEIn", DateTime.Parse(ActiveDate));
conn.Open();
outcome = cmd.ExecuteNonQuery();

Active Date is the possible null variable that I am going to pass in. Obviously you can't Convert a null value into a date Time. What would you guys suggest doing?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Since DateTime is a struct, it cannot contain a null value.

Some people use DateTime.MinValue to store a null value. A better approach would perhaps be to make ActiveDate a DateTime? instead.

Update:

You can also try something like:

cmd.Parameters.Add("ACTIVE_DATEIn", (ActiveDate == null ? OracleDate.Null : OracleDate.Parse(ActiveDate)));
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No good. I keep getting the same exception. But I do indeed like this answer. –  DmainEvent Dec 20 '11 at 20:04
    
If the value is null, try passing in OracleDate.Null instead. –  Mike Christensen Dec 20 '11 at 20:08

You can make DateTime implement INullable by placing a ? after the type.

DateTime? date;

Which is ofcourse equivalent to

Nullable<DateTime> date;
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You can use DateTime.MinValue instead of null, or make your DateTime object nullable.

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You may need to use DBNull.Value in the case that your ActiveDate represents a null.

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