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I have the following actions:

abstract class AAction
{}

class BlueAction: AAction
{
    void Foo1(){// do stuff}
    void Foo2(){// do stuff}
}

and the plugins that should contain an action:

class APlugin
{
    AAction _action;

    APlugin(AAction action)
    {
        _action = action;
    }

}

class BluePlugin: APlugin
{
    BluePlugin(): base(new BlueAction());
    {
    }

    voif Foo()
    {
        // do stuff with BlueAction's methods
        ((BlueAction)_action).Foo1();
        ((BlueAction)_action).Foo2();
    }
}

I am trying to fit this design to a design pattern, with no luck.

What I just want is to force derived classes from APlugin to have an AAction

I could do simply this:

BlueAction act = (BlueAction)_action;
act.Foo1();
act.Foo2();

Using generics (as suggested) doesn't allow me to have a list of APlugins which is something I really need.

But this is a no-go for me. Any ideas?

share|improve this question
1  
I think maybe you want Foo1 and Foo2 be abstract members of the base class? Then your call site would not require casting, _action.Foo1(); –  asawyer Dec 20 '11 at 19:56
    
the code class BlueAction: AAction { void Foo1(); void Foo2(); } is not compiling ..... –  Royi Namir Dec 20 '11 at 20:07
    
@asawyer No, I want BlueAction to have its own methods –  Odys Dec 20 '11 at 20:52
    
@RoyiNamir the code is for demonstration only, it's not copied from my project. My issue is about design and not finding the error :) –  Odys Dec 20 '11 at 20:53

3 Answers 3

up vote 14 down vote accepted

Use generics:

class APlugin<TAction> where TAction : AAction
{
    TAction _action;

    APlugin(TAction action)
    {
        _action = action;
    }

}

class BluePlugin: APlugin<BlueAction>
{
    BluePlugin(): base(new BlueAction());
    {
    }

    void Foo()
    {
        // do stuff with BlueAction's methods
        _action.Foo1();
        _action.Foo2();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1, beat me to it :-) –  Cameron Dec 20 '11 at 20:02
    
the code class BlueAction: AAction { void Foo1(); void Foo2(); } is not compiling - he cant have non abstract method in the class or a funciton without body.... the question is not understood –  Royi Namir Dec 20 '11 at 20:10
1  
I assume Foo1 and Foo2 have bodies, but they are just omitted in question for clarity. –  MagnatLU Dec 20 '11 at 20:12
    
@MagnatLU great solution. –  Royi Namir Dec 20 '11 at 20:23
1  
that answer to the other question is probably as close as you'll be able to come to doing this. it is still limited in that your list is not constrained to contain only APlugin instances, but the new dummy base class. it is probably not a big deal with this completely under your control and presumably no other implementation of the dummy base class, but still a limitation. also, that dummy base class should be an interface instead. you will not have the intent of having any implementation in there (presumably). –  Dave Rael Dec 20 '11 at 21:55

Assuming you want the constructors to stay the same, you could do it as follows:

class APlugin
{
    public AAction Action { get; private set; }

    APlugin(AAction action)
    {
        Action = action;
    }

}

class BluePlugin: APlugin
{
    private ActualAction
    {
        get { return Action as BlueAction; }
    }

    BluePlugin(): base(new BlueAction());
    {
    }

    void Foo()
    {
        // do stuff with BlueAction's methods
        ActualAction.Foo1();
        ActualAction.Foo2();
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Just keep the BlueAction instance:

class APlugin
{
    AAction _action;

    APlugin(AAction action)
    {
        _action = action;
    }
}

class BluePlugin: APlugin
{
    BlueAction _blueAction = new BlueAction();

    BluePlugin(): base(_blueAction) 
    { 
    }

    void Foo()
    {
        // do stuff with BlueAction's methods
        _blueAction.Foo1();
        _blueAction .Foo2();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
_action and _blue action should be one. If I set a property to action, this wont be in the _blueAction instance. What you say is bad design. –  Odys Dec 24 '11 at 20:34
    
No, it's not. Their are the same object, you just have two references. But is the same instance. It's the same you show in your example but keeping the reference in a field. I guess you didn't tried it before saying they are not the same and that it's a bad design... –  ivowiblo Dec 25 '11 at 0:48
    
actually I didn't notice the parameter in the BlueAction constructor... :p I like your approach. I don't like the fact that there would be two instances and they might confuse future developers –  Odys Dec 25 '11 at 17:08
    
You wont have two instances, it will be just one! and if your future developers may be confused with that, then you need better developers. It's the basics of c#. –  ivowiblo Dec 25 '11 at 18:19
    
I am only concerned about the fact that a developer isn't forced to add a blueAction field in the class. They might pass it to the base and continue casting from that point. –  Odys Dec 25 '11 at 18:59

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