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I know VS code folding issues are an old chestnut, but I haven't been able to find this in all the other discussions I have browsed through:

We have a team of C# guys, some love regions and others hate them and we don't seem to have much middle ground to work with.

Is there a plug- or add-in for VS that will just 'hide' the regions? So that those that want them will see them as normal, but the people that install the add-in and view a .cs file the regions just aren't there, as if they don't exist.

I can see this might be an issue when moving code around that it might cause issues of certain methods being in or outside of the wrong region, but that might be a tradeoff the team is happy with...

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Yes - not remove them, just make them invisible. –  KevinT May 13 '09 at 14:06
31  
Ugh, regions. Kings of code obfuscation. Deans of dire design. Oh how thou hast scorned me with thine presence. But for a moment to brush thee aside, leave the code open wide, for a browse or debuggery, yet with you, skullduggery. Ugh, regions. Foul captains of construction. Proud champions of chance. With thine secrets you hide, and all your insides. Hath you properties, say you? Yet a method or two, are well hidden within, where should I begin. Merchants of misuse. Avatars of abuse. Regions of reclus-ive code are thee. Ugh, regions, may your use be sparse and your number, few. Ugh, regions. –  Jeff Yates May 13 '09 at 14:41
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They're not bad if their contents are clearly labelled. Like freezer bags. –  Lucas Jones May 13 '09 at 19:20
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@person-b: Until someone ignores the label and shoves peas in with the carrots. –  Jeff Yates May 20 '09 at 18:13
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@LucasJones I was thinking more like the bags in a morgue. –  Yuriy Faktorovich Jul 3 '12 at 18:29

9 Answers 9

up vote 26 down vote accepted

I hate regions (my team loves them) and was surprised to find that nobody has written an extension to make them better. I finally wrote one myself:

Make #regions suck less (for free):

http://visualstudiogallery.msdn.microsoft.com/0ca60d35-1e02-43b7-bf59-ac7deb9afbca

  • Auto Expand regions when a file is opened
  • Optionally prevent regions from being collapsed (but still be able to collapse other code)
  • Give the #region / #end region lines a smaller, lighter background so they are less noticeable (also an option)
  • Works in C# and VB

Region Tool Screenshot

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@NotDan, ah, my apologies. In fact, just tried it out and this does exactly what I want. Very nice! –  Kirk Woll May 30 '11 at 20:40
    
@NotDan, OOOooooOOOooOoooOOO! Very cool! Finally, I can stop bitching to my coworkers who think regions are the greatest thing since sliced bread. :-) –  Nick Jun 1 '11 at 15:49
    
@NotDan: +1: Any chance you've a version of this for VS 2008? –  Binary Worrier Jun 7 '11 at 12:43
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@Binary Worrier: Unfortunately not, most of the code uses the new VS2010 extensibility APIs. I'm sure it could be done for VS2008 but it would be completely different code and not an easy port :( –  NotDan Jun 7 '11 at 18:35
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can you post the source for this? –  jberger Apr 27 '12 at 22:04

There are shortcut keys to deal with them:

Ctrl+M, Ctrl+M  Collapse or expand the block you're currently in.
Ctrl+M, Ctrl+O  Collapse all blocks in the file
Ctrl+M, Ctrl+L  Expand all blocks in the file
Ctrl+M, Ctrl+P  Stop outlining mode. (Ctrl+M, Ctrl+O resumes) 

See http://www.codinghorror.com/blog/archives/001147.html

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i constantly use these shortcuts as well –  jberger Apr 5 '12 at 14:47

Personally, I write a VS macro (Tools > Macro) to expand all regions on file open.

(Heh, second VS macro question in two minutes).

-Oisin

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Could you please post your macro here? Have no idea how to write them but regions drive me crazy already. –  User Jul 6 '09 at 14:47

I just wanted to write the same question!

We have regions everywhere in the code and I absolutely hate them.

You know why? You are somewhere in the code, you click F12 (go to definition), VS opens the file, points the cursor to the right place and the next second collapses the file. Terrific. So I have to click "Stop outlining", return to the original file, point to the object and make it "Go to definition" again. Why do I have to do it twice?

It's unbelievably annoying to always have to de-outline every single file every time you open it.

Who needs these regions actually? You have to be able to find what you need in file without regions, just use your dropdown lists with types and members.

if it's difficult to navigate, maybe you have too much in one file? What about restructuring stuff and splitting in in maybe ten files? Or is it a company style to develop the software in one single file? LOL

Just say No! to C# Regions

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I used to like and use regions, but now I've seen the light!

If you find yourself wanting to hide code, then surely it belongs in another class, or needs reorganising in some way?

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Quite often, yes, but this doesn't answer the OP's question, which is that given people who DO use regions, how do you view their code in Visual Studio as if regions didn't exist, without having to always go and expand all regions every time you open a file. Is there a plug-in that will do this for them. –  Jeff Yates May 13 '09 at 14:52
    
@Jeff Yates : Yes, I understand that jeff. I am making the point that they really serve no useful purpose. –  Mitch Wheat May 13 '09 at 15:05
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Yes, I know. But as it doesn't answer the question posted, you might want to consider putting it as a comment on the question rather than an answer. I totally agree with your sentiment but you're expressing it in the incorrect place. That's all. If you add an actual answer to the question into your post, it would be okay, of course. –  Jeff Yates May 13 '09 at 15:24

I don't know of any plugin like that, honestly. However, with VSTO, it's very easy to write one yourself.

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This is somewhat... sleazy, and may have side-effects but:

Tools-->Options-->Environment-->Fonts and Colors-->Preprocessor Keyword Change the foreground and background colours to white (or whatever your default background is).

You wont see other preprocessor keywords though.

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3  
This doesn't help if the region is collapsed - in fact, it could make it worse. –  Jeff Yates May 13 '09 at 14:42

For VS 2008 users, you can stop outlining and restart it programatically (via a macro). I found this code at http://weblogs.asp.net/rweigelt/archive/2003/07/06/9741.aspx

Imports EnvDTE

' Expands all regions in the current document    
Sub ExpandAllRegions()        
    DTE.ExecuteCommand("Edit.StopOutlining")        
    DTE.ExecuteCommand("Edit.StartAutomaticOutlining")    
End Sub

The above works for C# IDE; for some reason, VB's IDE doesn't remove outlining with regions when explicitly told to. Hope this helps!

-- appended edit:

Here's one that does work for Visual Basic .NET in Visual Studio 2008. It's a bit of brute force, but the idea is to comment all of the #region markers, expanding the outline. The next step uncomments them, returning them to their original state (not strictly true... could have rogue uses of #region in other parts of the code). This code doesn't return the Find & Replace dialog back to it's original state, either. With those caveats, this is the macro module that will perform this chore:

Imports System
Imports EnvDTE
Imports EnvDTE80
Imports EnvDTE90
Imports System.Diagnostics

Public Module MacroMod01
    Sub ExpandAllRegions()
    ' comment out all #region occurances
        DTE.ExecuteCommand("Edit.Replace")
        DTE.Find.Action = vsFindAction.vsFindActionReplaceAll
        DTE.Find.FindWhat = "#region"
        DTE.Find.ReplaceWith = "'#region"
        DTE.Find.Target = vsFindTarget.vsFindTargetCurrentDocument
        DTE.Find.MatchCase = False
        DTE.Find.MatchWholeWord = False
        DTE.Find.MatchInHiddenText = True
        DTE.Find.PatternSyntax = vsFindPatternSyntax.vsFindPatternSyntaxLiteral
        DTE.Find.ResultsLocation = vsFindResultsLocation.vsFindResultsNone
        DTE.Find.Action = vsFindAction.vsFindActionReplaceAll
        DTE.Find.Execute()

    ' uncomment all #region occurances
        DTE.ExecuteCommand("Edit.Replace")
        DTE.Find.Action = vsFindAction.vsFindActionReplaceAll
        DTE.Find.FindWhat = "'#region"
        DTE.Find.ReplaceWith = "#region"
        DTE.Find.Target = vsFindTarget.vsFindTargetCurrentDocument
        DTE.Find.MatchCase = False
        DTE.Find.MatchWholeWord = False
        DTE.Find.MatchInHiddenText = True
        DTE.Find.PatternSyntax = vsFindPatternSyntax.vsFindPatternSyntaxLiteral
        DTE.Find.ResultsLocation = vsFindResultsLocation.vsFindResultsNone
        DTE.Find.Action = vsFindAction.vsFindActionReplaceAll
        DTE.Find.Execute()

    'close the find 'n replace dialog
        DTE.Windows.Item("{CF2DDC32-8CAD-11D2-9302-005345000000}").Close()  

    End Sub

End Module

There may be a few other methods to accomplish this for VB in VS2008. I'll post as I find them.

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I think it is funny anyone that hates Regions. I love Regions so much I wrote a program called Regionizer, which is an open source project located at http://regionizer.codeplex.com

I have had bosses and some team members who hate them, but my tool organizes all code alphabetically, so methods are alphabetically sorted in the Methods Region, Properties are sorted in the Properties Region, and Events are sorted in the Events region.

Try to find code without this tool (or Regions) is what I call Spaghetti Code).

I have been searching for an easy way to collapse and expand all regions and have been told by MS that the regions are part of the .suo file (same name as the project or solution) and there is not an easy way to get a handle on the regions object them selves.

I have searched all through the DTE and I haven't found a way to collapse all or Expand all regions, I am going to try the Macro code and see if it works.

Will post an update shortly.

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Not sure if that's an april fools comment or not... There are better tools for this : red-gate.com/products/dotnet-development/smartassembly –  Stephane Jun 29 '12 at 9:32

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