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Preface: Just starting to learn DDD.

I'm trying to think of a gift card example that I could model using DDD. Say for example I have a gift card entity. In my system at some point a gift card amount is going to need to be reduced or redeemed. Would I use a gift card service object to reduce the amount? The service would include validating the incoming amount and making sure the new amount isn't more than the balance, ect. Or would this live right on my gift card entity as another method and then just pass my updated gift card object to my repository to persist?

public GiftCard
{
     public int Id { get; set; }
     public double Amount { get; set; }
}

public GifTCardService
{
     public void ReduceAmount(GiftCard card, double amount)
     {
         // Validation checks to make sure amount can be removed.
         // Call gift card repository to actually remove amount.
     }
}
share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

to start you probably want the properties to by read-only this way the Id and Amount cannot change just by setting the value.

next you will need a way to place transactions against the gift card these transactions would debit adjust the amount accordingly. something like

class GiftCard
{
    public long Id {get; private set;}
    public double Amount {get; private set;}

    public void Apply(Transaction tx)
    {
         if(tx.Amount > Amount)
         {
            handle insufficient funds
         }
         else
         {
            Amount -= tx.Amount;
            //other logic if necessary
         }
    }
}

keep in mind this is just one of many design options.

share|improve this answer
    
Would this gift card object above be the same one that the repository returns when I find by id? – Frankie Dec 20 '11 at 21:48
    
yes it could be. – Jason Meckley Dec 20 '11 at 21:54
    
I think what Frankie meant was if the object that he pulls from the database is the same one above... or could be the same one. I would say no. The reason is because this object (model) in DDD is total ignorant from whatever is coming from SQL, MYSQL, XML or whatever you choose to persist your objects. – Pepito Fernandez Oct 31 '12 at 1:31

This is just my opinion, but in situation like this I lean towards putting this logic right on the domain object. I actually don't really start using services unless some dependency will be introduced to the domain model, for example:

set user to registered, and send email using some sort of email sending service

in this case I would have a user registration service.

In your situation however, it will make life a lot easier to just have the domain object smart enough to validate setting it's own properties.

again, this is just how I look at it.

hope this helps

share|improve this answer

The bahviour should be on the entity. Also, Id and Amount should be private members with public accesser. So it would look like this:

public GiftCard 
{ 
     private int _id;
     private double _amount;

     public int Id 
     { 
         get { return _id; } 
         set { _id = value; }
     } 

     public double Amount 
     { 
         get { return _amount; }
         set { _amount = value; } 
     } 

     public void ReduceAmount(double amount) 
     {
         // Validation checks to make sure amount can be removed. 
         ...

         //Reduce amount.
         _amount -= amount;
     }
} 
share|improve this answer
    
What If I want to keep track of every amount reduced for a given gift card in the database? Would I call the repository from the method ReduceAmount on the entity to insert the record? How would I go about that? Btw, thanks for the help. – Frankie Dec 21 '11 at 14:14
    
One way to do this would be to have a Payment object, and for GiftCar to have a collection of Payment objects. For each amount that is added, put the value of amount into the Payment object and add it to the collection. Make sure the Payment object is mapped. Then if you are using NHibernate or simmilar, when you save the GiftCard object, all the Payment objects will save with it. You don't need to access the repository from the entity, and in fact this is an anti-pattern. – Paul T Davies Dec 21 '11 at 15:13
    
Ok. Great. That makes sense. Thanks. – Frankie Dec 21 '11 at 16:34

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