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I know generally empty List is more prefer than NULL. But I am going to return NULL, for mainly two reasons

  1. I have to check and handle null values explicitly, avoiding bugs and attacks.
  2. It is easy to perform ?? operation afterwards to get a return value.

For strings, we have IsNullOrEmpty. Is there anything from C# itself doing the same thing for List or IEnumerable?

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6  
No but adding an extension method is trivial. – Aaron McIver Dec 20 '11 at 21:43
    
possible duplicate of How to check if IEnumerable is null or empty? – octothorpentine Jul 23 '15 at 21:40
up vote 34 down vote accepted

nothing baked into the framework, but it's a pretty straight forward extension method.

See here

/// <summary>
    /// Determines whether the collection is null or contains no elements.
    /// </summary>
    /// <typeparam name="T">The IEnumerable type.</typeparam>
    /// <param name="enumerable">The enumerable, which may be null or empty.</param>
    /// <returns>
    ///     <c>true</c> if the IEnumerable is null or empty; otherwise, <c>false</c>.
    /// </returns>
    public static bool IsNullOrEmpty<T>(this IEnumerable<T> enumerable)
    {
        if (enumerable == null)
        {
            return true;
        }
        /* If this is a list, use the Count property for efficiency. 
         * The Count property is O(1) while IEnumerable.Count() is O(N). */
        var collection = enumerable as ICollection<T>;
        if (collection != null)
        {
            return collection.Count < 1;
        }
        return !enumerable.Any(); 
    }

Daniel Vaughan takes the extra step of casting to ICollection (where possible) for performance reasons. Something I would not have thought to do.

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2  
Caution must be taken though that the call to enumerable.Any() can lose an element of a non-rewindable enumeration. You can wrap it in something that'll keep track of that first element (and handle null nicely of course or we negate the OP's whole issue), but it can be handier in some cases to coalesce with an empty enumeration and just use the result. – Jon Hanna Dec 20 '11 at 23:40
1  
Should one also try casting to non-generic ICollection, since an IEnumerable<Animal> might be something like an instance of List<Cat>, which does not implement ICollection<Animal> but does implement non-generic ICollection? – supercat Aug 3 '12 at 19:37
5  
as seen here: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb337697%28v=vs.110%29.aspx (check remarks) "The enumeration of source is stopped as soon as the result can be determined." wich makes me think a cast to collection is unnecessary as enumerable.Any() should have O(1) as well. so why cast to a list if you don't really know it is a list? – xmoex Mar 31 '14 at 7:33
1  
The comment about "IEnumerable.Count() is O(N)" is correct... but the code isn't doing that, it's calling Any(). Although it's still a good idea to cast so that you can avoid the GetEnumerator and MoveNext code under the hood when calling Any. – Lee Grissom Nov 8 '14 at 5:41
1  
This could now be written in one line: return a == null || ((a as ICollection)?.Count == 0) || !a.Any(); – PRMan May 7 at 14:31

There is nothing built in.

It is a simple extension method though:

public static bool IsNullOrEmpty<T>(this IEnumerable<T> enumerable)
{
  if(enumerable == null)
    return true;

  return !enumerable.Any();
}
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3  
You need a "not" on the collection.Any() call. – That Chuck Guy Dec 20 '11 at 21:48
    
@ChuckBlumreich - Thanks for the correction. – Oded Dec 20 '11 at 21:49
    
Also why you name it collection? it's better to name it enumerable. – Saeed Amiri Dec 20 '11 at 21:51
    
I wonder why both this and the accepted answer both missed the ! before the Any() call. That same bug got propagated into my team's source code. – stannius Apr 18 at 17:25
var nullOrEmpty = list == null || !list.Any();
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If you need to be able to retrieve all of the elements in the case of it not being empty, then some of the answers here won't work, because the call to Any() on a non-rewindable enumerable will "forget" an element.

You could take a different approach and turn nulls into empties:

bool didSomething = false;
foreach(var element in someEnumeration ?? Enumerable.Empty<MyType>())
{
  //some sensible thing to do on element...
  didSomething = true;
}
if(!didSomething)
{
  //handle the fact that it was null or empty (without caring which).
}

Likewise (someEnumeration ?? Enumerable.Empty<MyType>()).ToList() etc. can be used.

share|improve this answer
    
Could you give me an example of a non-rewindable collection in .NET? I mean just name of an existing class in the framework, not asking you to give me an example implementation of one. – AaronLS Oct 21 '13 at 19:52
    
@AaronLS the result of most Linq queries. – Jon Hanna Oct 21 '13 at 20:25
    
What would be the concrete type in that case? I'm aware of IQueryable which isn't really a list until you try to ToList/foreach at which point it materialized. I imagine there is some intermediate concrete type for IQueryable that is a forward only data reader under the hood, so what you say makes sense, I just can't imagine where you'd actually encounter this problem. If you foreach(var item in someQueryable) would generate its own eneumerator, and then did someQueryable.Any() would be a seperate query and wouldn't affect the current foreach enumerator AFAIK. – AaronLS Oct 21 '13 at 21:52
    
Not challenging you, just trying to explain my confusion. – AaronLS Oct 21 '13 at 21:53
    
@AaronLS it would be a separate enumerator, which would require you to run the query again, which is bad enough. If it was cast to IEnumerable then even more so, as the query will have been lost. – Jon Hanna Oct 21 '13 at 22:43

As everyone else has said, nothing is built into the framework, but if you are using Castle then Castle.Core.Internal has it.

using Castle.Core.Internal;

namespace PhoneNumbers
{
    public class PhoneNumberService : IPhoneNumberService
    {
        public void ConsolidateNumbers(Account accountRequest)
        {
            if (accountRequest.Addresses.IsNullOrEmpty()) // Addresses is List<T>
            {
                return;
            }
            ...
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I modified the suggestion from Matthew Vines to avoid the "Possible multiple enumeration of IEnumerable" - problem. (see also the comment from Jon Hanna)

public static bool IsNullOrEmpty(this IEnumerable items)
    => items == null
    || (items as ICollection)?.Count == 0
    || !items.GetEnumerator().MoveNext();

... and the unit test:

[Test]
public void TestEnumerableEx()
{
    List<int> list = null;
    Assert.IsTrue(list.IsNullOrEmpty());

    list = new List<int>();
    Assert.IsTrue(list.IsNullOrEmpty());

    list.AddRange(new []{1, 2, 3});
    Assert.IsFalse(list.IsNullOrEmpty());

    var enumerator = list.GetEnumerator();
    for(var i = 1; i <= list.Count; i++)
    {
        Assert.IsFalse(list.IsNullOrEmpty());
        Assert.IsTrue(enumerator.MoveNext());
        Assert.AreEqual(i, enumerator.Current);
    }

    Assert.IsFalse(list.IsNullOrEmpty());
    Assert.IsFalse(enumerator.MoveNext());
}
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