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On my previous post Adding a object randomly on the screen in as3 I explained the specifics of my situation. But I will go over it again. I have a box with a class(not my document class. I do have one called Main but this one is just an AS class referencing my box.) The classes name is Box and my MC box is exported as Box. This is the code

this is in my main file on the main timline

addEventListener(Event.ENTER_FRAME, createbox);
var _box:Box = new Box;
var boxlimit:int = 2;
function createbox (event:Event):void{
_box = new Box;
_box.x = Math.random()*stage.stageWidth ;
_box.y = Math.random()*stage.stageHeight;
addChild(_box);
}

This is my Box class

//package {
//  import flash.display.MovieClip;
//  import flash.events.Event;
//  import flash.events.MouseEvent;
//
//  public class Main extends MovieClip {
//      
//      public function Main() {
//          createBox();
//
//      }
//
//      private function createBox():void {
//
//           trace(Math.random()*stage.stageWidth)
//          _box.x = Math.random()*stage.stageWidth ;
//          _box.y = Math.random()*stage.stageHeight;
//          stage.addChild(_box);
//          
//      }
//  }
//}

This was actualy what was on the class before i tried what was above but i would rather keep all the code in the class.

Any suggestions?

share|improve this question
    
Just to be sure, you want to create a class that will add a new instance of your Box library item randomly on the Stage. So you'll just have to call new Box() for it to work, right? – Rick van Mook Dec 20 '11 at 22:02

Here's one way to go about it: When you set the class name for your MovieClip (export as actionscript class) you have the option to specify a base class for the clip. You can add your random position code in this base class like so:

public class BoxBase extends MovieClip
{
    public function BoxBase()
    {
        super();
        addEventListener(Event.ADDED_TO_STAGE, _onStaged);
    }

    public function _onStaged(event:Event):void
    {
        this.x = Math.random()*stage.stageWidth;
        this.y = Math.random()*stage.stageHeight;
    }
}

Note the ADDED_TO_STAGE event listener. Now that the code is inside your MC, you have to wait until it's been added to the display list (placed on the stage or as a child of a clip on the stage) before you can reference the "stage" variable.

Once you've set BoxBase to be the base class for Box, you can create a new instance of Box at a random position by placing the following code in your document class:

var b:Box = new Box();
addChild(b);
share|improve this answer

Here you have the opposite situation as in your previous question. You declare a Box variable outside the createBox() function , so redeclaring the variable inside the function will not create more boxes.

  //It should be something like this, without the
  // need to declare the _box variable outside the
  // function.
  // As dugulous points out you have to make sure that 
  // stage is not null before calling this
  function createbox (event:Event):void
  {  
     if( stage != null )
     {
       var _box = new Box;
       _box.x = Math.random()*stage.stageWidth ;
       _box.y = Math.random()*stage.stageHeight;
       addChild(_box);
     }
  }

In your example , you use an EnterFrame event to add your boxes... How many do you need? A Timer would give you more control over the number of boxes and it's also easier to stop.

  var delay:int = 500; // in milliseconds
  var numBoxes:int = 2000; 

  // you could add an optional limit
  var timer:Timer = new Timer( delay , numBoxes );
  // var timer:Timer = new Timer( delay ); would work too

  timer.addEventListener( TimerEvent.TIMER , createBox );
  timer.start();

  //Change createBox() accordingly...
  function createbox (event:TimerEvent):void
  {  
      var _box = new Box;
     _box.x = Math.random()*stage.stageWidth ;
     _box.y = Math.random()*stage.stageHeight;
     addChild(_box);
  }

Whenever you're bored with adding boxes, you simply call this

 timer.stop();
share|improve this answer
package
{   
  import flash.events.Event;
  import flash.display.MovieClip;

  public class Main extends MovieClip
  {
    private var _box:Box;

    public function Main()
    {
        addEventListener(Event.ENTER_FRAME, createbox);         
    }

    private function createbox (event:Event):void
    {
         _box= new Box();
        _box.x = Math.random()*stage.stageWidth ;
        _box.y = Math.random()*stage.stageHeight;
        addChild(_box);
    }
  }
}
share|improve this answer

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