Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

No way to have console wired with Heroku lately:

lsoave@ubuntu:~/rails/github/gitwatcher$ heroku run console
Running console attached to terminal... 
Timeout awaiting process
lsoave@ubuntu:~/rails/github/gitwatcher$ 

Does it happen to anyone else ?

share|improve this question
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

From: http://devcenter.heroku.com/articles/oneoff-admin-ps

The heroku run process opens a connection to Heroku on port 5000. If your local network or ISP is blocking port 5000, or you are experiencing a connectivity issue, you will see an error similar to:

$ heroku run rails console
Running rails console attached to terminal... 
Timeout awaiting process

You can test your connection to Heroku by trying to connect directly to port 5000 by using telnet to rendezvous.heroku.com. A successful session will look like this:

$ telnet rendezvous.heroku.com 5000
Trying 50.19.103.36...
Connected to ec2-50-19-103-36.compute-1.amazonaws.com.
Escape character is '^]'. 

If you do not get this output, your computer is being blocked from accessing our services. We recommend contacting your IT department, ISP, or firewall manufacturer to move forward with this issue.

share|improve this answer
2  
Any other means (than tunneling) you can suggest to configure "run" to access through any whitelisted port like 22 or via web UI? –  Artem Oboturov Mar 12 '12 at 21:43
2  
port 5000 isn't blocked for me, but I still am getting the "Timeout awaiting process". –  Arcolye Feb 14 '13 at 4:06
add comment

I had the same problem on the ISP FastWeb, which is an ISP here in Italy. Based on my Googling, it appears that they block port 5000.

To get around it for now, I am running the following:

heroku run:detached rake db:migrate

That tells it to run without waiting to connect to my machine on port 5000. Then, you can examine the logs for your process you just kicked off. (The heroku command will tell you this after you run it):

heroku logs -p run.1

That tells it to output the logs for the running process. But I found that the logs command was exiting even though my process was still running. To get around that, you can add "-t" if you want to "tail" the logs:

heroku logs -p run.1 -t   

You'll know your process is done when you see something like this in the logs:

2012-10-14T15:36:41+00:00 heroku[run.1]: Process exited with status 0
2012-10-14T15:36:41+00:00 heroku[run.1]: State changed from up to complete

I'm sure someone could whip up a script that would 1: Run the given heroku command with run:detached 2: Examine the output to determine what its process name was (run.1, run.2, etc) 3: run heroku logs -p run.1 -t and show me the output 4: exit the logs process when it sees something like State changed from up to complete

share|improve this answer
1  
I contacted Heroku support and they were able to help me even further so that the workaround wasn't necessary. Props to Heroku. –  Taytay Jan 18 '13 at 8:36
    
thanks from Italy (Fastweb user...) for the workaround. How to avoid this workaroud? I'd like to use other commands such as run and so on. What they did for you? –  Fabio Apr 15 '13 at 19:22
    
Fabio, Heroku can change the default port on a per-application basis from 5000 to something else. So, just let them know you've got this issue with app X, and after they work some magic on their end, you can do "heroku run" to your heart's content. –  Taytay Apr 27 '13 at 14:46
    
OP wants to run the interactive console, so this solution unfortunately won't work for their use case. –  user456584 Mar 21 at 19:53
    
That's true - this won't work for the interactive console. It worked for me "in a pinch" though, since I usually just needed to run a command or two. –  Taytay Mar 25 at 19:42
add comment

There's a way to bypass this restriction by executing commands you were going to execute with 'heroku run ...' directly as system calls.

For this heroku command: heroku run rake db:migrate One could make a call in Ruby system("rake db:migrate")

This call could be done as a result on some HTTP GET request - you better protect by some means, so that it wouldn't be accessible for strangers.

It's not a nice way - but when you don't have a choice - it works.

share|improve this answer
    
that's intresting thanks –  Luca G. Soave Mar 13 '12 at 19:27
add comment

I've just connected successfully to a console on Heroku

Is it all apps or just a single one? I'd suggest checking your heroku gem is up to date, that you can run other commands like heroku ps, restart your application via heroku restart - if you've tried these then get in touch with Heroku support as something is wrong with your application.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.