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I was wondering if PHP can do this as there seems to be no good solution to it yet:

p($i)

and it will print

$i is 5

and

p(1 + 2)

will print

1 + 2 is 3

and

p($i * 2)  =>  $i * 2 is 10  
p(3 * factorial(3))  =>  3 * factorial(3) is 18

C and Ruby both can do it... in C, it can be done by stringification, and in Ruby, there is a solution using p{'i'} or p{'1 + 2'} (by passing the block with the binding over, to do an eval)... I wonder in PHP, is it possible too?

share|improve this question
    
Another "Ruby is better then PHP" question? :) – Csaba Kétszeri May 13 '09 at 15:46
    
@CsabaKétszeri there's no question, it is ;) – Damien Roche Dec 24 '11 at 8:30
up vote 3 down vote accepted

I think it could be done by taking a backtrace then loading and tokenizing the file that calls p(). I wouldn't call it a "good" solution though.

Of course you could stringify it yourself...

p('$i');

function p($str) 
{
    echo $str, " = ", eval("return ($str);");
}
share|improve this answer
    
Using var_export would be nice. – Gumbo May 13 '09 at 14:46
    
stingify it myself... that's so funny – 太極者無極而生 May 13 '09 at 14:54

If you mess with the string to make it into a return statement, you can use eval...

function p($expr)
{
   $php="return {$expr};";
   echo "$expr is ".eval($php)."\n";
}


p("1+2");

Works for simple expressions, but if you tried to reference a variable in your $expr, then it wont find it inside the scope of function p() - a little hack like the following can help:

function p($expr)
{
   $php="return {$expr};";
   $php=preg_replace('/\\$(\w+)/', '$GLOBALS[\'$1\']', $php);


   echo "$expr is ".eval($php)."\n";
}

$x=5;
p('$x+4');

Here we've search for variable references in the code and turned them into $GLOBALS array references. The expression $x+4 is turned into return $GLOBALS['x']+4;

Not sure I'd ever want to see this in production code though :)

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Well, if you pass in a string, you can use eval to do the calculation.

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the function won't be able to evaluate the global though – 太極者無極而生 May 13 '09 at 14:47

Short answer: no

The problem with eval() based solutions is scope. The following won't work:

function p($expr)
{
   $php="return {$expr};";
   echo "$expr is ".eval($php)."\n";
}

$i = 10;

p('$i + 1');

because $i won't be in scope when eval() is called.

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