Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

The clojure document gives the following examples:

(take 10 (iterate (partial + 2) 0))

(def powers-of-two (iterate (partial * 2) 1))
(take 10 powers-of-two)

(def fib (map first (iterate (fn [[a b]] [b (+ a b)]) [1 1])))
(take 10 fib)

Anyone can explain the syntax of clojure's iterate function in more detail? I am very confused with all the usage. Why two brackets are there in (fn [[a b]] [b (+ a b)])?

Another example can be found here:

(defn iter [[x y]]
  (vector y (+ x y)))

(nth (iterate iter [0 1]) 10000)
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 11 down vote accepted

iterate takes a function f and an initial value x and produces a lazy sequence. The first element in the seq is x. Each subsequent element is computed by calling f with the previous element.

Example 1:

(iterate (partial + 2) 0)

This generates a sequence, starting at 0, where each element is the previous element with 2 added to it. I.e.:

0
(+ 2 0) ; => 2
(+ 2 2) ; => 4
(+ 2 4) ; => 6
; etc

Each element in the seq is passed to (partial + 2) when generating the following element.

Example 2:

(iterate (partial * 2) 1)

This generates a sequence, starting at 1, where each element is the previous element multiplied by 2. I.e.:

1
(* 2 1) ; => 2
(* 2 2) ; => 4
(* 2 4) ; => 8
(* 2 8) ; => 16
; etc

Again, you can see how each element feeds into the generation of the next one.

Example 3:

(iterate (fn [[a b]] [b (+ a b)]) [1 1])

Firstly, (fn [[a b]] ...) is a way to destructure a value into parts. In this case, the function accepts a two-element vector and unpacks it into the local variables a and b.

The function returns a two-element vector containing b and the sum of a and b (i.e. the second value in the previous pair and the sum of both values in the previous pair).

With this in mind, this iterate call generates:

[1 1]
[1 (+ 1 1)] ; => [1 2]
[2 (+ 1 2)] ; => [2 3]
[3 (+ 2 3)] ; => [3 5]
[5 (+ 3 5)] ; => [5 8]
; etc

Then (map first ...) grabs the first value in each pair, which gives you your Fibonacci sequence.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the nice work! –  Abimaran Kugathasan Dec 21 '11 at 5:30
1  
Thanks so much~ This is fantastic! –  lkahtz Dec 21 '11 at 6:55

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.