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How would you go about writing a perl script to check if a file exists?

For example, if I want to check whether $file exists in $location.

Currently I'm using a lengthy subroutine (see below) which I'm sure there is an easier way to do?

# This subroutine checks to see whether a file exists in /home
sub exists_file {
  @list = qx{ls /home};
  foreach(@list) {
  chop($_);
  if ($_ eq $file) {
    return 1;
  }
}
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marked as duplicate by tchrist Apr 23 at 9:50

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4 Answers 4

Use the -e operator:

if (-e "$location/$file") {
    print "File $location/$file exists.\n";
}

You may want to use something more robust than concatenation to join $location with $file, though. See also the documentation for File::Spec (included with Perl) or Path::Class.

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2  
There is also a -f operator for checking that it's a file and -d for directories. There are others. You can see an exhaustive list here in excerpted from the perlfunc man page. –  zostay Dec 21 '11 at 3:11

Everyone else's solution misreports "inability to determine if the file exists" as "file doesn't exist". The following doesn't suffer from that problem:

sub file_exists {
   my ($qfn) = @_;
   my $rv = -e $qfn;
   die "Unable to determine if file exists: $!"
      if !defined($rv) && !$!{ENOENT};
   return $rv;
}

If you also want to check whether it's a plain file (i.e. not a directory, symlink, etc) or not,

sub is_plain_file {
   my ($qfn) = @_;
   my $rv = -f $qfn;
   die "Unable to determine file type: $!"
      if !defined($rv) && !$!{ENOENT};
   return $rv;
}

Documentation: -X

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1  
What's $!{ENOENT}? –  Zaid Dec 21 '11 at 7:23
    
@ikegami Interesting. But that's a lot of boilerplate. Didn't find a module on cpan that delivers your checks. Do you know of one? –  Jan Hartung Dec 21 '11 at 11:02
1  
@Jan Hartung, Maybe autodie? –  ikegami Dec 21 '11 at 19:15
    
@Zaid, You know better than that! :) %! in perlvar –  ikegami Dec 21 '11 at 19:27

yes, assuming $your_file is the file you are checking for (something like /home/dude/file.txt):

You can just use

if(-e $your_file){
   print "I'm a real life file!!!"
}
else{
   print "File does not exist"
}
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sub file_exists { 
    return 1 if -f '/home/' . $_[0];
}

And call it like e.g.

if ( file_exists( 'foobar' ) ) { ... }  # check if /home/foobar exists
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Somewhat of an overkill to use a subroutine for a function. =) –  TLP Dec 21 '11 at 3:52
3  
return 1 if … bad style at best, antipattern at worst. Just return the boolean expression itself! return -f … –  daxim Dec 21 '11 at 17:47

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