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I have a three columns Excel file,which has the following pattern

12   A    P1  
23   B    P5
24   C    P2
15   D    P1
06   E    P5

The structure underlying this data set is that, P1 contains A and D; A corresponds to 12 and D corresponds to 15 P2 contains C; C corresponds to 24 P5 contains B and E; B corresponds to 23 and E corresponds to 06

I want to represent this kind of structure in a hashed structure i.e., use P1 as a key to point to a hash, and A is used as the key for this second level hash. Is there a way to implement this in Perl?

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Export as CSV. –  Brad Gilbert Dec 21 '11 at 4:19

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Spreadsheet::ParseExcel can be used to parse .xls files. Below is a sample program that builds the desired data structure.

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;

use Data::Dumper;
use Spreadsheet::ParseExcel;

my $parser    = Spreadsheet::ParseExcel->new;
my $workbook  = $parser->parse( shift or die "Please provide a file\n" );
my $worksheet = $workbook->worksheet(0);

my %data;
for my $row ( 0 .. $worksheet->row_range ) {
    my $value     = $worksheet->get_cell( $row, 0 )->value;
    my $key       = $worksheet->get_cell( $row, 1 )->value;
    my $super_key = $worksheet->get_cell( $row, 2 )->value;
    $data{$super_key}->{$key} = $value;
}

print Dumper \%data;

Output

$VAR1 = {
          'P5' => {
                    'E' => '06',
                    'B' => '23'
                  },
          'P2' => {
                    'C' => '24'
                  },
          'P1' => {
                    'A' => '12',
                    'D' => '15'
                  }
        };
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I had to process data in spreadsheets in the past. If you are dealing with a small number of Excel files, export them manually to CSV files using a spreadsheet software such as Excel. Then parse the CSV file, and store the cell values in a hash of hashes in perl:

#!/usr/bin/env perl
use warnings;
use strict;

use Data::Dumper::Simple;

my $file = "";
my @row = ();
my $rowidx = 1;
my %hh = (); # hash of hashes

open( INFILE, "input.csv" ) or die("Can not open input file: $!");

while ( $file = <INFILE> ) {
    @row = parse($file);
    chomp(@row);

    $hh{ $row[2] }{ $row[1] } = $row[0];
    #warn Dumper %hh; # debug

    $rowidx++;
}

close(INFILE);

warn Dumper %hh;

exit;

sub parse {
    my @newrow  = ();
    my $columns = shift; # read next row
    push( @newrow, $+ ) while $columns =~ m{"([^\"\\]*(?:\\.[^\"\\]*)*)",?|([^,]+),?|,}gx; # parse and store columns to array 
    push( @newrow, undef ) if substr( $columns, -1, 1 ) eq ',';
    return @newrow;
}

Running this gives

$ more input.csv
12,A,P1
23,B,P5
24,C,P2
15,D,P1
06,E,P5
$ ./ReadCSV.pl input.csv 
%hh = (
    'P5' => {
              'E' => '06',
              'B' => '23'
            },
    'P2' => {
              'C' => '24'
            },
    'P1' => {
              'A' => '12',
              'D' => '15'
            }
  );
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1  
Why reinvent the wheel? Use a module designed to handle csv, such as Text::CSV. –  TLP Dec 21 '11 at 6:41

There's the Spreadsheet::ParseExcel function which does a pretty good job of parsing a regular *.xls spreadsheet.

Fortunately, there's an extension called Spreadsheet::XLSX that works with Spreadsheet::ParseExcel to also read *.xlsx spreadsheets too. The methods used in Spreadsheet::ParseExcel work with both *.xls and *.xlsx files if you also have Spreadsheet::XLSX also installed.

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What version of excel are the files formatted in?
I have had a very good experience with reading from (and writing to) .xls files using the modules Spreadsheet::ParseExcel (Spreadsheet::WriteExcel for output)

Unfortunately, I did this 4 years ago and the .xlsx format was not as prevalent, so I can't speak for those.

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