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Given the following pre-existing framework, I need to find good design patterns to create different instances of derived class.

The main challenges that I have are as follows:

challenge-1> Each class has more than 10 fields and how to pass those fields to derived class and then to base class effectively.

To target this issue, I can figure out four solutions, but none of them appealing to me.

Method 1> pass all parameters in simple format

classA::classA(int field1, float field2, ..., double field29)

=> cons: it is not a good idea to create a function with more than 6~7 pass-in parameters

Method 2> pass all parameters as a structure

struct DataClassA
{
int field1;
float field2;
...
double field29;
};

struct DataClassBA : DataClassA
{
int    m_iField30;
// ...
double m_iField40;
};

So first I pass DataClassBA to classBA and then in turn classBA pass DataClassA to classA. => cons: type DataClassBA and classBA are similar types and except one contains operations while the other doesn't. Also, when passing structure to the constructors, there is a penalty of copies and duplicates. Imagine for each different class, we have to define a similar structure in order to hold all initialization data. The key different between the class and its corresponding structure is that class contains some methods while structure is purely used for transferring data.

Method 3> set all fields by Set functions

classA
{
public:
    int Field1() const { return m_iField1; }
    classA& Field1(int field1)
    {
      m_iField1 = field1;
      return *this;
    }
    ...
}

classBA : public classA
{
public:
    int Field30() const { return m_iField30; }
    classBA& Field30(int field30)
    {
      m_iField30 = field30;
      return *this;
    }
    ...
}

=> cons: each creation of an instance will cause many functions calls and very expensive.

Method 4> pass the map to all constructors of base and derived class.

=> cons: I really think this is bad idea though it makes the data passing easy.

challenge-2> The default value of base class is determined by its different derived class. For example, the default value of classA::m_iField2 is different based on different derived class.

To target this issue, I can figure out two solutions, but none of them appeal to me.

Method 1> Add the default logic to the derived class itself.

Method 2> Add the default logic to the factory class itself.

I have listed all methods I could think about. However, I still look for a clean and professional solution to this problem. It will be best, if there is a well-written API library where I can use as reference to address this similar issue. Any comment is welcome.

thank you

/////////////////////// framework ////////////////////////////////////////
// Note: 
// <1> the class hierarchy has to kept as this
// <2> getter and setter functions in each class have to kept as this
// <3> add new functions(i.e constructors) are allowed
// <4> add new classes or structures are allowed
/////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
#include "stdafx.h"
#include <map>
#include <string>
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

/************************************************************************/
/* Class Name: classA (an abstract base class)
 * default value of m_iField2 is determined by its derived class
/************************************************************************/
class classA
{
public:
    virtual ~classA() = 0 {}
    // ...
private: // 
    int m_iField1;
    float m_iField2;  // one of the potential field that has to get the default value
    // ...
    double m_iField29;
};
/************************************************************************/
/* Class Name: classBA
 * If the pass-in parameters do NOT include value for the field classA::m_iField2
 * then assign its value as 200.0f
/************************************************************************/
class classBA : public classA
{
    // ...
private:
    int    m_iField30;
    // ...
    double m_iField40;
};

/************************************************************************/
/* Class Name: classCA
 * If the pass-in parameters do NOT include value for the field classA::m_iField2
 * then assign its value as 300.0f
/************************************************************************/
class classCA : public classA
{
    // ...
private:
    int m_iField50;
    // ...
    int m_iField60;
};

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    map<string, string> mapStrsBA;
    mapStrsBA["name"] = "classBA";
    mapStrsBA["field1"] = "5";
    // ...
    mapStrsBA["field40"] = "1.89";
    // pass mapStrsBA to a factory class with function to create a new instance of class classBA

    map<string, string> mapStrsCA;
    mapStrsBA["name"] = "classCA";
    mapStrsBA["field1"] = "6";
    // ...
    mapStrsBA["field60"] = "19";
    // pass mapStrsCA to a factory class with function to create a new instance of class classCA
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
1  
Your cons for #2 are not necessarily true. Consider having classes DataForA, DataForB, and DataForAAndB : DataForA, DataForB. Then, A can have a data member of type DataForA and B can have a data member of type DataForB. No duplication, and you get the 'named parameters'. –  James McNellis Dec 21 '11 at 4:47

8 Answers 8

Let me add a method 5 to your challenge 1, which is not always, but often applicable, especially if you happen to have many fields: Find member fields which strictly belong together, and collect them into logical objects. For example, assume you have a class Shape which looks like this:

class Shape
{
public:
  Shape(pass initial values for all member variables);
  // ...
private:
  // bounding box coordinates
  int xmin, xmax;
  int ymin, ymax;
  // color
  int red, green, blue;
  int alpha;
  // center point (for rotations)
  int cx, cy;
};

This is 10 variables. However, those are not really unrelated. Most of them are x/y pairs, and then there's a set specifying color. Thus you may rewrite this as follows:

struct Point
{
  int x, y;
  Point(int ax, int ay): x(ax), y(ax) {}
};

struct Color
{
  int red, green, blue, alpha;
  Color(int r, int g, int b, int a): red(r), green(g), blue(b), alpha(a) {}
};

class Shape
{
public:
  // ...
private:
  // bounding box
  Point lower_left, upper_right;
  Color color;
  Point center;
};

Now suddenly you only have four variables to pass around. You might even think of making a rectangle type consisting of two corner points and using that for the bounding box, further reducing the number of variables to 3.

Note that not only is the number of parameters to pass reduced, it also adds clarity.

Now since you didn't give any detail about your classes, I cannot say if such logical grouping is possible for your class, too, but given the large amount of parameters you mentioned, I'd be surprised if not.


As of challenge 2, I'd consider it better to add the default logic to the derived class.

share|improve this answer
    
You have given a decent idea for how to shrink the pass-in parameter and the example is very clear. However as you indicated, my class members are not easily grouped into one or two big groups. If I adopt your idea, I have to introduce too many different structures and each only hold limited members. In that case, I rather just group all members into one structure. Regarding how my class is structured, we can assume that the member variables have no direct relationship among them. thank you –  q0987 Jan 11 '12 at 18:15
    
+1: @q0987: It's unlikely that all those 10 fields are equally independent. This would mean really complicated logic that in any case needs some simplification even by artificial grouping. Such grouping can help to receive simpler and more maintenable implementation. –  Andy T Jan 12 '12 at 16:50

For challenge 1, I think method 2 is better. I don't know what your cons mean. Even you pass the value by parameters, you still need copy the value to Class s member. Struct only makes your constructor simple. And I think you don't need inheritance. How about:

struct DataClassA
{
    int field1;
    float field2;
    ...
    double field29;
};

struct DataClassBA
{
    DataClassA a;
    int    m_iField30;
    // ...
    double m_iField40;

};

For challenge 2, I think you can set the default value in the data struct. And you change the value if you don't want default value. For example:

DataClassA::DataClassA()
{
    field1 = 1;
}

DataClassBA::DataClassBA()
{
    a.filed1 = 2;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I have updated my meaning of duplicate. –  q0987 Dec 21 '11 at 5:52

For the first challenge, I would recommend method 3, declaring your set methods as inline (your compiler may do this anyway, however it never hurts to give it a hint). Also, it seems unnecessary in such instances to return a value, I'd write:

inline void Field30(int field30)
{
  m_iField30 = field30;
}

That's a reasonable starting point on which to build the other methods, given that they're all largely extensions over a simple get/set pattern. The con you've listed seems to me, premature optimisation.

Challenge 2 is easily solved by declaring a public or protected constructor in the base class that accepts the default value as an argument, and call that constructor in the initialisation list of the derived class, like so:

class Base
{
private:

    int Value;

protected:

    Base(int value) :
        Value(value)
    {
        // Do nothing.
    }
};

class Derived : public Base
{
public:

    // A default constructor, that sets the base class default value.
    Derived() :
        Base(5)
    {
        // Do nothing.
    }
};

By declaring the constructor as protected and not providing a default, you also prevent instances of the base being created which aren't inherited by a derived class.

share|improve this answer

i would like to use the "compile firewall" to make the object fields out of the business object.

struct classAObject
{
    int field1;
    //...
    int field20;
};
struct classBObject : public classAObject
{
    int field30;
    //...
    int field50;
};

class classA
{
   public:
   classA(classAObject* impl) {pImplA = impl;}
   private:
   classAObject* pImplA;
};
class classB : public classA
{
   public:
   classB(classBObject* impl):classA(impl) {pImplB = impl;}
   private:
   classBObject* pImplB;
};

then you could use it.

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I'll answer the easy one first. ;) For challenge #2, you should implement the default logic in each derived class. The main reason for this is that you can later add new derived classes with different logic without having to touch any code except the derived class itself. It encapsulates your logic.

For challenge #1... If it were me, I'd create a structure containing the values for the base class. Then, I'd create a structure for the derived class that contains only the fields specific to the derived class as well as one element of the parent structure type.

struct BaseStruct {
   int BaseValue;
}
struct DerivedA {
   BaseStruct BaseData;
   int DerivedField;
}

You can continue this nesting as deeply as your inheritance hierarchy dictates. In the constructor, pass the structure's BaseData to the base class then deal with the structure's class-specific elements. Again, this partitions your code so that only the logic specific to a derived class exists in the derived class and the derived class contains all of the logic that's specific to that derived class.

share|improve this answer

challenge 1 : I would go for the method 2. You should put all fields into one structure, and initialize only fields that are relevant for particular constructor.

challenge 2 :

Implement it in the derived class.

Next example demonstrates the above decisions :

#include <string>
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

struct InitializationData
{
    // for the base class
    int m_iField1;
    //float m_iField2;  // one of the potential field that has to get the default value
    // ...
    double m_iField29;

    // for the classBA
    int    m_iField30;
    // ...
    double m_iField40;

    // for the classCA
    int m_iField50;
    // ...
    int m_iField60;
};

class classA
{
public:
    classA( const InitializationData &data,
            const float m_iField2_ ):
        m_iField1( data.m_iField1 ),
        m_iField2( m_iField2_ ),
        m_iField29( data.m_iField29 )
    {
    }
    virtual ~classA() {}
    // ...
private: //
    int m_iField1;
    float m_iField2;  // one of the potential field that has to get the default value
    // ...
    double m_iField29;
};

class classBA : public classA
{
public:
    classBA( const InitializationData &data ):
        classA( data, 0.1 ),
        m_iField30( data.m_iField30 ),
        m_iField40( data.m_iField40 )
    {
    }
    virtual ~classBA() {}
private:
    int    m_iField30;
    // ...
    double m_iField40;
};

class classCA : public classA
{
public:
    classCA( const InitializationData &data ):
        classA( data, 0.3 ),
        m_iField50( data.m_iField50 ),
        m_iField60( data.m_iField60 )
    {
    }
    virtual ~classCA() {}
private:
    int m_iField50;
    // ...
    int m_iField60;
};

classA* Create( const InitializationData &data, const int type )
{
    switch ( type )
    {
        case 0 :
            return new classBA( data );
            break;
        case 1 :
            return new classCA( data );
            break;
        default :
            ;
    }

    return nullptr;
}

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    InitializationData data;

    // initialize data
    data.m_iField1 = 1;
    data.m_iField29 = 1;

    data.m_iField30 = 30;
    data.m_iField40 = 40.0;

    data.m_iField50 = 50;
    data.m_iField60 = 60;

    // create the object of specific type
    auto obj = Create( data, 1 );
    // use obj
}
share|improve this answer

Try to think about this problem not in more abstract terms than structs and classes. What you do here is passing a configuration (or initialisation parameters if you like) to the object. You can pass them as individual parameters (method 1), as a single big configuration object (method 2) or as several specialized configuration set (celtschk solution). You can use the Builder pattern to help you create the configuration object(s).

If possible, it is best to pass the configuration in the constructor, as it allows you to define the members as const, thus limiting the possible states the object can be in (so avoid method 3). Always define the parameters explicitly, the code is easier to understand and refactor (so avoid method 4). And if you have a choice, favour composition over inheritance (as Shawnone also advices).

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Have you considered the Template pattern - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Template_method_pattern

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