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I've got a bunch of numbers in an array and I need to do some statistics on them. I need to know how many of each number there are in the array.

Here's the array:

myArray =
[2, 3, 3, 3, 4, 4, 5, 5, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 7, 7, 7, 7, 8, 8, 8, 8, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 9, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 11, 11, 11, 11, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 12, 13, 13, 14, 14, 14, 14, 14, 14, 15, 15, 17, 17, 17, 18, 18, 18, 18, 18, 18, 18, 18, 19, 19, 19, 19, 19, 20, 20, 20, 20, 20, 21, 21, 21, 21, 22, 22, 22, 22, 22, 22, 23, 23, 23, 23, 23, 23, 24, 24, 24, 25, 25, 25, 25, 25, 25, 25, 25, 25, 26, 26, 27, 27, 28, 30, 30, 31, 31, 31, 31, 31, 31, 31, 31, 32, 32, 32, 32, 32, 32, 32, 33, 33, 33, 33, 33, 33, 34, 34, 35, 35, 35, 35, 35, 35, 36, 36, 36, 36, 36, 36, 37, 37, 37, 37, 37, 37, 37, 38, 38, 38, 38, 38, 39, 39, 39, 39, 39, 39, 40, 40, 40, 41, 41, 42, 42, 42, 42, 42, 42, 43, 43, 43, 44, 44, 44, 44, 44, 45, 45, 46, 46, 46, 46, 46, 46, 46, 47, 47, 47, 47, 47, 47, 48, 48, 48, 49, 49, 49, 49, 49, 49, 49, 49, 49, 50, 50, 50, 50, 50, 51, 51, 51, 51, 51, 51, 51, 51, 51, 51, 52, 52, 53, 53, 53, 53, 53, 53, 53, 54, 54, 54, 55, 55, 55, 55, 55, 56, 57, 57, 57, 57, 57, 57, 57, 58, 59, 59, 59, 59, 59, 60, 60, 60, 60, 60, 61, 61, 62, 62, 63, 63, 63, 64, 64, 64, 64, 64, 65, 65, 66, 66, 66, 67, 67, 67, 68, 68, 68, 69, 69, 69, 69, 69, 69, 70, 70, 71, 71, 71, 71, 71, 71, 71, 72, 73, 73, 73, 73, 74, 74, 74, 75, 75, 75, 76, 77, 78, 78, 79, 79, 80, 80, 81, 81, 81, 81, 81, 82, 82, 82, 82, 83, 83, 83, 83, 84, 84, 84, 85, 85, 85, 85, 85, 86, 86, 86, 86, 86, 86, 87, 87, 87, 88, 88, 89, 89, 90, 90, 91, 91, 91, 92, 93, 94, 95, 95, 95, 95, 95, 96, 96, 96, 96, 97, 97, 99, 99, 99, 99, 99, 101, 101, 102, 102, 103, 103, 105, 105, 105, 106, 107, 107, 108, 108, 109, 109, 109, 109, 110, 112, 112, 113, 113, 113, 114, 114, 115, 116, 116, 117, 118, 120, 121, 121, 121, 122, 122, 123, 123, 123, 124, 124, 124, 124, 125, 126, 127, 128, 129, 130, 130, 131, 131, 131, 131, 132, 133, 133, 134, 134, 134, 136, 136, 136, 136, 137, 137, 137, 138, 138, 138, 139, 139, 139, 140, 141, 141, 142, 142, 143, 144, 144, 144, 144, 145, 150, 150, 153, 155, 159, 160, 160, 161, 162, 164, 164, 166, 176, 180, 180, 180, 181, 181, 187, 191, 192, 193, 194, 197, 200, 203, 211, 216, 224, 251, 280, 333]

Here's what I'm using to parse through it currently (which is not working very well):

    for (var key in myArray){
        var obj = myArray[key];

        var count = 0;
        while(obj < 30){
            myArrayStats[0] = count;
            obj++;
        }
        while(obj > 30 && obj < 40){
            myArrayStats[1] = count;
            obj++;
        }
        //etc....
    }

Creating a new array using object literals would be much nicer and easier to use, but I'm not sure how to do it.

share|improve this question
    
I guess you wanted something more like if (obj < 30) { myArrayStats[0] = (myArrayStats[0] || 0) + 1; } else if (obj >= 30 && obj < 40) { myArrayStats[1] = (myArrayStats[1] || 0) + 1; } etc?? Anyway, hope the answers below clear it up. –  David F Dec 21 '11 at 9:07
    
In R, one would simply do table(cut(myArray, c(0, 30, 40, Inf))) and the result is (will probably get broken: (0,30] (30,40] (40,Inf] 113 56 326˛ :) You could add -Inf to have values smaller than zero on the left side. –  Roman Luštrik Dec 21 '11 at 9:08

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This just works whether your array is sorted or not, but it shouldn't be much slower than any algorithm that takes advantage of the fact that it is sorted anyways:

var myArrayStats = [];
for(var i = myArray.length; i--;)
    myArrayStats[myArray[i]] = (myArrayStats[myArray[i]] || 0) + 1;

console.log(myArrayStats[6]);  // Outputs 7
console.log(myArrayStats[10]); // Outputs 5
console.log(myArrayStats[20]); // Outputs 5

If you want to do this for only a portion of the original array than use slice() to get the portion of the array you want and then do the same thing as above on that array:

var mySubArray = myArray.slice(0,30);
var myArrayStats = [];
for(var i = mySubArray.length; i--;)
    myArrayStats[mySubArray[i]] = (myArrayStats[mySubArray[i]] || 0) + 1;

console.log(myArrayStats[6]);  // Outputs 7
console.log(myArrayStats[9]);  // Outputs 7
console.log(myArrayStats[10]); // Outputs undefined
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! That's almost what I'm looking for. Now, how would I find only the number of items in a certain range for these values, between say 0 - 30, and 30 - 60, and 60 - 90 etc, similar to the while loop I used above? Could you increment by a value like 30? –  michael Dec 21 '11 at 7:27
    
@michael I updated my answer. –  Paulpro Dec 21 '11 at 7:44

It sounds like you have equally spaced bins and want to count how many values fall in each. Since this question was tagged with jQuery, let's use a utility function from that to avoid an explicit loop to show another way to do things. (I guess PaulPRO's approach is superior though.)

function hist(values, min, max, numBins) {
    var bins = [];
    var range = max - min;
    jQuery.each(values, function(i, value) {
        var bin = Math.floor(numBins * (value - min) / range);
        bin = Math.min(Math.max(bin, -1), numBins) + 1;
        bins[bin] = (bins[bin] || 0) + 1;
    });
    return bins;
}

We can exercise the above code with the following:

function consoleHist(values, min, max, numBins) {
    var bins = hist(values, min, max, numBins);
    var step = (max - min) / numBins;
    jQuery.each(bins, function(i, count) {
        var lower = (i - 1) * step + min;
        var upper = lower + step;
        if (lower < min) {
            lower = -Infinity;
        }
        if (upper > max) {
            upper = Infinity;
        }
        console.log('[' + lower + ', ' + upper + '): ' + (count || 0));
    });
}

consoleHist([-10, 0, 11, 29, 30, 59, 60, 1000], 0, 60, 2);

Produces the following output on the console:

[-Infinity, 0): 1
[0, 30): 3
[30, 60): 2
[60, Infinity): 2
share|improve this answer

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