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here is my hook script that should restrict the commit for cpp file with no comments.but it fails to execute ...any ideas

        #!/bin/bash

        REPOS="$1" 
        TXN="$2"

        SVNLOOK="/usr/bin/svnlook"
        AWK="/usr/bin/awk"
        GREP="/bin/egrep"
        SED="/bin/sed"

       CHANGED=`$SVNLOOK changed -t "$TXN" "$REPOS" | $GREP "^[U|A|M]" | $AWK '{print                  
       $2}' | $GREP \\.cpp$`

       for FILE in $CHANGED
       do 
        MESSAGE=`$SVNLOOK log -t "$TXN" "$REPOS" "$FILE" | sed 's/ *//g' |$GREP ".\              
       {16,\}"` 
       if [ $? -ne 0 ] 
       then 
       echo 1>&2 
       echo "***********************************" 1>&2 
       echo `echo "$MESSAGE"` 1>&2 
       echo "***********************************" 1>&2 
       exit 1 
       fi 
       done
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It looks like a pre-commit hook (not mentioned in your question). Is it a server side hook script? Why do you have added the label tortoisesvn to it? Have you tried to log at least the call itself, so that you can see if the script is called at all? –  mliebelt Dec 21 '11 at 7:42
    
ya it is a server side hook.that should produce result in client side –  shaggy Dec 21 '11 at 8:27

2 Answers 2

Make sure the pre-commit script has the execute permission (chmod +x pre-commit)

Also, make sure that the script is indeed being executed but you don't realize that it is. Note that the echo messages are echoed to the client only when there is an error and you do exit with non-zero error code.

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First of all:

  • Only messages to STDERR are printed and only if the exit of the pre-commit script is something other than zero. Otherwise, there's no print out at all.
  • Commit messages are for the entire commit. That means you don't check the commit message of every single file. It's the same for them all.
  • You can find the commit message by looking at the revision property svn:log. You don't have to look at the message.

Try this completely untested rewrite:

#!/bin/bash

REPOS="$1" 
TXN="$2"

SVNLOOK="/usr/bin/svnlook"
AWK="/usr/bin/awk"
GREP="/bin/egrep"
SED="/bin/sed"

if "$SVNLOOK" changed -t $TXN | grep -q "^ *[UAM].*\.cpp$"
then
    MESSAGE=$("$SVNLOOK" pget -t $TXN --revprop "$REPOS" svn:log)
    if [ -z ${MESSAGE:16} ]
    then 
        echo "Committing a *.cpp file, but didn't put a comment!" >&2
        exit 1      #CPP, but message too short
    else
    exit 0  #CPP Files but message is long enough
fi
exit 0      #No CPP files

Here are some of the changes:

You had this:

CHANGED=`$SVNLOOK changed -t "$TXN" "$REPOS" | $GREP "^[U|A|M]" | $AWK '{print $2}' | $GREP \\.cpp$`

You push it through a grep, through an awk, and then through another grep. Instead, why not do the entire line at once?

"$SVNLOOK" changed -t $TXN "$REPOS" | $GREP -q "^ *[UAM].*\.cpp$"
  • The [UAM] means either a U or a M or a A. You don't need the | between each.
  • The $GREP -q means do the grep quietly. If you found something, it returns a 0, otherwise, it returns a 1. You can put this directly into your if statement without the [...] testing braces.
  • The .*\.cpp$ means I'm looking at the rest of the line and seeing if it ends with .\.cpp No need for the grep|awk|grep pipe.
  • There's only a single log message, so all I have to do is check it once. No need for a loop.
  • Notice I use the $(...) instead of back ticks. It does the same thing, but is easier to see.
  • I use ${MESSAGE:16}. In BASH, this does a 16 character offset of my message. If my message is shorter than 16 characters, then ${MESSAGE:16} is blank. I can then use -z to see if the offset string is empty or not. Saves you the pipe to sed, then grep.

See if this works a bit better. In fact, run this as a regular shell script outside the hook. You can change the -t to a -r and put in various revision numbers. This way, you can verify the script first before trying it as a hook. Then, make sure this is called pre-commit and that you have the permissions set to rwxr-xr-x.

Even better, try my pre-commit hook. It's battle tested, and can do more. It's a Perl script, but it should run in any Perl version greater than 5.8, and you probably already have Perl on your system. You can check the svn:log for length, but my hook script doesn't allow you to specify it based upon what is committed. However, why should you allow any blank commit message anyway -- whether or not a *.cpp file was committed?

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