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On full .Net Framework I use the following code:

socket.SetSocketOption(
  SocketOptionLevel.Socket, SocketOptionName.ReceiveTimeout, readTimeout);
socket.SetSocketOption(
  SocketOptionLevel.Socket, SocketOptionName.SendTimeout, writeTimeout);

However, Windows Mobile does not support this and throws exceptions.

I am currently in the middle of testing this solution for implementing timeouts.

Does anyone know a better way? I'd like to avoid spawning multiple threads if possible, this is an embedded device after all.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

This code works, raising timeouts when expected (it is a modified version of the example I linked in the question):

// copied from Mono, because CF lacks this enum
enum SocketError
{
    IOPending = 997,
    NoBufferSpaceAvailable = 10055,
    TimedOut = 10060,
    WouldBlock = 10035
}

// milliseconds
int receiveTimeout = 20000;
int sendTimeout = 20000;

public override int Read(byte[] buffer, int offset, int size)
{    
    int startTickCount = Environment.TickCount;
    int received = 0;
    do
    {
    	List<Socket> sock = new List<Socket>(new Socket[] {socket});
    	Socket.Select(sock, null, null, receiveTimeout*1000 + 1);
    	if (Environment.TickCount > startTickCount + receiveTimeout)
    		throw new SocketException((int) SocketError.TimedOut);
    	try
    	{
    		received += socket.Receive(buffer, offset + received,
    			size - received, SocketFlags.None);
    	}
    	catch (SocketException ex)
    	{
    		if (ex.ErrorCode == (int) SocketError.WouldBlock ||
    		    ex.ErrorCode == (int) SocketError.IOPending ||
    		    ex.ErrorCode == (int) SocketError.NoBufferSpaceAvailable)
    		{
    			// socket buffer is probably empty, wait and try again
    			Thread.Sleep(30);
    		}
    		else
    			throw; // any serious error occurr
    	}
    } while (received < size);
    return received;
}

public override void Write(byte[] buffer, int offset, int size)
{
    int startTickCount = Environment.TickCount;
    int sent = 0;
    do
    {
    	List<Socket> sock = new List<Socket>(new Socket[] {socket});
    	Socket.Select(null, sock, null, sendTimeout*1000 + 1);
    	if (Environment.TickCount > startTickCount + sendTimeout)
    		throw new SocketException((int) SocketError.TimedOut);
    	try
    	{
    		sent += socket.Send(buffer, offset + sent,
    			size - sent, SocketFlags.None);
    	}
    	catch (SocketException ex)
    	{
    		if (ex.ErrorCode == (int) SocketError.WouldBlock ||
    		    ex.ErrorCode == (int) SocketError.IOPending ||
    		    ex.ErrorCode == (int) SocketError.NoBufferSpaceAvailable)
    		{
    			// socket buffer is probably full, wait and try again
    			Thread.Sleep(30);
    		}
    		else
    			throw; // any serious error occurr
    	}
    } while (sent < size);
}

The crucial element missing from the example I found is Socket.Select(IList checkRead, IList checkWrite, IList checkError, int microSeconds). Bear in mind that this method may modify the list that is passed to it (that's why my code creates a new one each time) and measures time in microseconds instead of milliseconds. And remember to use Environment.TickCount (which is a monotonic time source) instead of DateTime.Now for measuring time.

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What are the Socket.Select calls good for? Why not simply Send/Receive immediately and then sleep longer (e.g. 500ms) when an exception is thrown? –  Andreas Huber May 26 '09 at 15:07
    
Socket.Select ensures that the following operation will not block. If it wasn't present, the whole thing would still wait infinitely. –  skolima May 27 '09 at 10:46
1  
socket.Poll() is a slightly simpler choice, if you don't need to wait for multiple sockets. –  Paul Du Bois Apr 7 '10 at 20:50
    
If you're connected, but no one send you data, you will wait indefinitely, regardless of the timeout... –  Nick Nov 8 '12 at 10:57

I had the same issue. This can be fixed uding a EventWaitHandle which is described here post

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