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I want to be able to check if a certain service is running (say it had a Display name - ServiceA). I want my program to check say every 5 mins that the service is still running. If it is fine, it will loop and wait another 5 mins and then check again. If it finds that ServiceA has stopped I want the program to email me and say...ServiceA has stopped running. Below I have the code which I have done so far which is able to pull all the current services running and there actual display name back to the console. Anyone any ideas on the code/logic needed for what I need above?

namespace ServicesChecker
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            ServiceController[] scServices;
            scServices = ServiceController.GetServices();

            Console.WriteLine("Services running on the local computer:");
            foreach (ServiceController scTemp in scServices)
            {
                if (scTemp.Status == ServiceControllerStatus.Running)
                {
                    Console.WriteLine();
                    Console.WriteLine("  Service :        {0}", scTemp.ServiceName);
                    Console.WriteLine("    Display name:    {0}", scTemp.DisplayName); 
                }
            }
            //Create a Pause....
            Console.ReadLine();
        }
    }
}
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what happens when the checker stops running...! –  Daniel Powell Dec 21 '11 at 8:24
2  
Windows can already do this for you. You don't need to write an application just to trigger an action when a service stops or fails. –  Cody Gray Dec 21 '11 at 8:25
    
@Cody: Hoes does Windows do that? –  abatishchev Dec 21 '11 at 8:29
1  
@abatishchev: In the "Services" manager (services.msc), right-click on a service, and then switch to the "Recovery" tab. You can ask Windows to do various things on the first, second, and subsequent failure of a service, including starting an application. No reason to write an application that polls. Continuous polling is almost always the wrong solution. –  Cody Gray Dec 21 '11 at 8:48
    
@Cody: Thanks for the tip! –  abatishchev Dec 21 '11 at 8:51

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Put every service's name in an array and check if your wanted name is running

List<string> arr = new List<string>();    
foreach (ServiceController scTemp in scServices)
{
    if (scTemp.Status == ServiceControllerStatus.Running)
    {
        arr.add(scTemp.ServiceName);
    }
}
if (arr.Contains("YourWantedName")
{
    // loop again
}
else
{
    // send mail
}
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For a snippet to send mail from c#: social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en/netfxnetcom/thread/… It should contain everything you need to send a simple message. –  Martin Stam Dec 21 '11 at 8:25
1  
Please, never suggest to use non-generic containers like ArrayList in the end of 2011! Use generic like List<string> instead. –  abatishchev Dec 21 '11 at 8:28
    
@abatishchev - what would be the logic for the loop again code so I can keep checking the array for the name of my service? –  Ctrl_Alt_Defeat Dec 21 '11 at 9:53
    
you can use a timer, it needs to call this function every X minutes/hours. for timer, search on this site or at msdn website –  Moonlight Dec 21 '11 at 12:50

There's no need to iterate over all services, if you know which one you're looking for: you can instantiate ServiceController with the service name.

As for sending an email: take a look at the System.Net.Mail.MailMessage class.

NB: You know that you can also just configure the service to trigger an action if it fails?

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as far as getting the service to trigger an action - would that mean you could trigger it to send an email if it stops? How do you go about this? –  Ctrl_Alt_Defeat Dec 21 '11 at 8:42
    
Find (or write) a command-line tool that sends an email, and configure it as per the instructions Cody Gray described in his comment to your question. –  Arnout Dec 21 '11 at 8:52
    
Thanks for that –  Ctrl_Alt_Defeat Dec 21 '11 at 9:10

You will need to track the state of the service which will require some sort of storage. The simplest is probably an XML file that tracks the status of the service, maybe a schema like this

<services>
 <service name="service1" last-check="12/21/2011 13:00:05" last-status="running" />
 ...
</services>

Your monitoring app, will wake up find the status of the services it is interested in, and check to see what that service's previous status was. If the status was running, but is currently stopped, send the email. If the service wasn't found add it to the list of services.

Persisting the status of the services to disk protects you in the case when your monitoring app goes down.

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Heres an example of a service which does quite something similar. Should be simple to adapt it to your needs..

    public partial class CrowdCodeService : ServiceBase
    {
        private Timer stateTimer;
        private TimerCallback timerDelegate;
        AutoResetEvent autoEvent = new AutoResetEvent(false);

        public CrowdCodeService()
        {
            InitializeComponent();
        }
        int secondsDefault = 30;
        int secondsIncrementError = 30;
        int secondesMaximum = 600;
        int seconds;
        protected override void OnStart(string[] args)
        {
            Loggy.Add("Starting CrowdCodeService.");
            timerDelegate = new TimerCallback(DoSomething);
            seconds = secondsDefault;
            stateTimer = new Timer(timerDelegate, autoEvent, 0, seconds * 1000);
        }

        static bool isRunning = false;

        // The state object is necessary for a TimerCallback.
        public void DoSomething(object stateObject)
        {
            if (CrowdCodeService.isRunning)
            {
                return;
            }
            CrowdCodeService.isRunning = true;
            AutoResetEvent autoEvent = (AutoResetEvent)stateObject;
            try
            {

                ////// Do your work here


                string cs = "Application";
                EventLog elog = new EventLog();
                if (!EventLog.SourceExists(cs))
                    {
                        EventLog.CreateEventSource(cs, cs);
                    }
                    elog.Source = cs;
                    elog.EnableRaisingEvents = true;

                    elog.WriteEntry("CrowdCodes Service Error:" + cmd.Message.ToString(), EventLogEntryType.Error, 991);
                }
            }
            finally
            {    
                CrowdCodeService.isRunning = false;
            }

        }


        protected override void OnStop()
        {
            Loggy.Add("Stopped CrowdCodeService.");
            stateTimer.Dispose();
        }
    }
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