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I have a table with a big data (around 10 million record), so that the simplest update statment take for ever.

For example:

update mesg 
set archived = 1
    , last_update = SYSDATE 
where id = 0 
and crea_date_time < '07/27/2011 13:53:36' 

and archived = 0;

This statement takes around 3 Hours. although we have index on id, and composite index on crea_date_time, and there is no triggers.

Is there any enhancement I can do to increase the performance.

I tried to add index on archive but with no effect.


here is some extra information.

CREATE TABLE "MESG"
  (
    "ID"                        NUMBER(3,0) NOT NULL ENABLE,
    "UMIDL"                     NUMBER(10,0) NOT NULL ENABLE,
    "UMIDH"                     NUMBER(10,0) NOT NULL ENABLE,
    .
    .
    .
    "ARCHIVED"          NUMBER(1,0) NOT NULL ENABLE,
    "LAST_UPDATE" DATE,
    "CREA_DATE_TIME" DATE NOT NULL ENABLE,
    .
    .
    .
    CONSTRAINT "PK_RMESG" PRIMARY KEY ("AID", "UMIDH", "UMIDL") USING INDEX PCTFREE 10 INITRANS 2 MAXTRANS 255 COMPUTE STATISTICS STORAGE(INITIAL 524288 NEXT 524288 MINEXTENTS 1 MAXEXTENTS 2147483645 PCTINCREASE 0 FREELISTS 1 FREELIST GROUPS 1 BUFFER_POOL DEFAULT FLASH_CACHE DEFAULT CELL_FLASH_CACHE DEFAULT) TABLESPACE "XXXX_IDX" ENABLE
  )

  SEGMENT CREATION IMMEDIATE PCTFREE 10 PCTUSED 40 INITRANS 1 MAXTRANS 255 NOCOMPRESS LOGGING STORAGE
  (
    INITIAL 524288 NEXT 524288 MINEXTENTS 1 MAXEXTENTS 2147483645 PCTINCREASE 0 FREELISTS 1 FREELIST GROUPS 1 BUFFER_POOL DEFAULT FLASH_CACHE DEFAULT CELL_FLASH_CACHE DEFAULT
  )
  TABLESPACE "XXXX_MESG" ;

The indexes:

CREATE INDEX "E_RCREATIONDATE" ON "RMESG"
  (
    "CREA_DATE_TIME"
  )
  PCTFREE 10 INITRANS 2 MAXTRANS 255 COMPUTE STATISTICS STORAGE
  (
    INITIAL 524288 NEXT 524288 MINEXTENTS 1 MAXEXTENTS 2147483645 PCTINCREASE 0 FREELISTS 1 FREELIST GROUPS 1 BUFFER_POOL DEFAULT FLASH_CACHE DEFAULT CELL_FLASH_CACHE DEFAULT
  )

  TABLESPACE "XXXX_IDX" ;
CREATE UNIQUE INDEX "PK_RMESG" ON "RMESG"
  (
    "ID", "UMIDH", "UMIDL"
  )
  PCTFREE 10 INITRANS 2 MAXTRANS 255 COMPUTE STATISTICS STORAGE
  (
    INITIAL 524288 NEXT 524288 MINEXTENTS 1 MAXEXTENTS 2147483645 PCTINCREASE 0 FREELISTS 1 FREELIST GROUPS 1 BUFFER_POOL DEFAULT FLASH_CACHE DEFAULT CELL_FLASH_CACHE DEFAULT
  )
  TABLESPACE "XXXX_IDX" ;

And The query plan is for my local machine with 180K records

ID   PID   Operation   Name   Rows   Bytes   Cost   CPU Cost   IO Cost   Temp space   IN-OUT   PQ Dist   PStart   PStop
0      UPDATE STATEMENT      1    44    877    6245703    877                       
1   0     UPDATE   MESG                                           
2   1       TABLE ACCESS BY INDEX ROWID   MESG   1    44    877    6245703    877                       
3   2         INDEX RANGE SCAN   IX_MESG_CREATIONDATE   158K       877    6245703    877                       
share|improve this question
2  
how many records are affected by the update? –  Thilo Dec 21 '11 at 8:19
1  
10 million is not a lot of records. This seems crazy it would take 3 hours even if you didn't index anything at all. Do you have a primary key defined? This is crazy. –  Jason Sebring Dec 21 '11 at 8:19
    
Are there concurrent updates from other transactions? Could you be waiting on a lock? –  Thilo Dec 21 '11 at 8:21
    
Yes I have a primary key, and the effected records around 158K –  Ehab Al-Hakawati Dec 21 '11 at 8:21
4  
Sounds like update is caught in row-lock contention, check v$locked_object to see if there's any objects preventing the update from going through –  Sathya Dec 21 '11 at 9:13
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6 Answers

I assume that archived is a pseudo-boolean that can be either 0 or 1. In such a case the optimizer might choose to ignore the index.

In order to verify if the index is used you might try

explain plan for
   update mesg set archived = :a, 
                   last_update = :b 
     where id = :c and 
            crea_date_time < :d and 
            archived = :e;  

and then

select * from table(dbms_xplan.display);
share|improve this answer
    
CPU cost is 6245703 over 180K records (Updated records 158K) for my dev machine –  Ehab Al-Hakawati Dec 21 '11 at 8:28
    
I don't think the index is the problem. A full table scan would be fast enough. 3 hours is just crazy. –  Thilo Dec 21 '11 at 8:38
1  
@Thilo, I agree. I just wanted to point out that an index is not always the super weapon that it is sometimes portrayed to be. –  René Nyffenegger Dec 21 '11 at 8:44
    
+1 Rene, indexes are not always a silver bullet. –  Ollie Dec 21 '11 at 11:36
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If you update many rows, indexes will not help you. They only improve acces to data.

What is slow for you is the UPDATE itself.

A. Is this table read/updated heavy by users?

If not, you can try to recreate the table with new data.

create table copy_table as
select case 
       when s.archived = 0 and s.crea_date_time < '07/27/2011 13:53:36' and s.id = 0
       then 1 else s.archived as archived,
       when s.archived = 0 and s.crea_date_time < '07/27/2011 13:53:36' and s.id = 0
       then sysdate else s.last_update_date as last_update_date,
       id,
       other_columns
from mesg;

rename mesg to mesg_old;
rename copy_table to mesg;

B. Another ideea/help is, if you have license, to partition your mesg table on crea_date_time (I assume it is date type). In this case, your update, will not scan entire table, but more important, probably you'll never need to mark as archive things. Old partitions - old data.

C. The index on CREA_DATE_TIME is slowing your update. If it is not absolutley necessary, drop it.

share|improve this answer
1  
Since an update involves access to data, an index might help boost performance in an update statement. So your assertion about the index not helping is wrong. Other than that: I fail to see how recreating the table with new data will help the OP. –  René Nyffenegger Dec 21 '11 at 8:26
3  
10 milion table cand be read entirely in 10 seconds - 3 minutes. What is hard in his case is the update (the write) –  Florin Ghita Dec 21 '11 at 8:29
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First do you really mean to run:

update mesg  
set archived = 1     
, last_update = SYSDATE  
where id = 0  and crea_date_time < '07/27/2011 13:53:36'  
and archived <>1

( is <> the right code for ORacle? Or does is use !=? or maybe where archived is null or where archived = 0 depanding on how you store the data)

Right now you are changing the last_update date and the archived field for all the records already archived. So you could be updating millions of records that are already archived. So rather than update the 120,000 records that need to be archived since teh last time you did it you are updating 35,000,000 records most of which are already archived. Can make a big difference in performance to only update records that need to be updated.

Next I don't know about Oracle, but sometimes it is faster to run a large update/insert/delete in batches in SQl Server. So have you tried looping through 1000 (or 50000 you may have to test to see what works) at a time? This can reduce a lot of contention on the table and make things work faster.

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Indexes are not the problem. It's the updating.

I think you'll have to dive into wait analysis, dictionary table v$session_waits. If you have enterprise manager database control you can use the performance tools to see what is causing the delay. My guess is that is has something to do with IO performance of the redo logs OR as others mentioned a locking issue.

To start with:

select
 seq#, event, p1, p2, p3
from
 v$session_wait_history
where
sid = <yoursid>
order by seq#
;   

Google on oracle wait analysis, you'll find lot's of material.

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Three hours is too long, even for the amount of data.

You can try to modify query to avoid type casting, apply to_data function to your date string (convert this '07/27/2011 13:53:36' to date)

But the problem should be locks, you can check for locks with Killing an oracle session to remove a lock script.

Also, you can split your big query in small updates, some thinkl like:

for each year:
   begin transaction
   update statement where year(date) = @year and other conditions
   end transaction
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You should go for table partitioning and index partitioning. Performance will increase

share|improve this answer
    
already partitioned :) –  Ehab Al-Hakawati Jan 20 at 11:31
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