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template <size_t M, size_t N, typename T>
class Matrix
{
public:
    Matrix<M, N, T> operator +(const Matrix<M, N, T>& B) const;
    template <size_t P> Matrix<M,P,T> operator*(const Matrix<N, P, T>& B) const;
    template <typename T2> operator T2() const;  

private:
  T __x[M][N];
};

The body has written fine, and everything works well. When I define two Matrices as below:

Matrix < 10, 10, int> m1;
Matrix < 10, 10, float> m2;

m1 + m2;  // OK
m1 * m2;  // error: no match for 'operator*' in 'm1 * m2'

The addition works well, because an implicit casting has performed on it, but for the multiplication of different value types, an error occurs.

error: no match for 'operator*' in 'm1 * m2'

Any idea ?!

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How is this a PHP or MySQL question? –  GordonM Dec 21 '11 at 8:49
1  
Did I left out some classes of php or wtf!? –  Gundars Mēness Dec 21 '11 at 8:58
    
Can you please post the entire error-message you get? –  Björn Pollex Dec 21 '11 at 10:23
    
There is no such thing as "implicit casting". –  Lightness Races in Orbit Dec 21 '11 at 10:25
1  
Aren't identifiers starting with double underscore reserved? –  R. Martinho Fernandes Dec 21 '11 at 10:54
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1 Answer

This question has a similar problem. The reason for you error is that implicit conversions are not considered when deducing template arguments. Since your multiplication operator is a function-template, and you call without explicitly providing the parameter, the compiler tries to deduce the argument type and fails. To demonstrate, if you explicitly provide the parameter P, it compiles:

m1.operator*<10>(m2);

To fix the problem, you could make the value-type of the right-hand-side a template-argument too:

template <size_t P, typenmame T2> 
Matrix<M,P,T> operator*(const Matrix<N, P, T2>& B) const;
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I'm slightly surprised it works for the op+, then. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Dec 21 '11 at 10:28
    
@TomalakGeret'kal: It is not a function-template, so no arguments have to be deduced. –  Björn Pollex Dec 21 '11 at 10:30
    
OK, true; but then the T in op* is not deduced either. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Dec 21 '11 at 10:31
    
Right. I am not sure, but the error-message does not actually say that the mismatch is due to T - it could be due to P (or the inability to deduce it). –  Björn Pollex Dec 21 '11 at 10:33
1  
@Tomalak: this answer is correct. Implicit conversions are not considered when deducing. See this simple example: ideone.com/c59AZ –  R. Martinho Fernandes Dec 21 '11 at 11:03
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