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what is the reason that <img> tag cannot be nested in <a> tag by HTML5 specifications

<a href="#">
    <img src="src" alt="alt"/>
</a>

visual studio 2010 sp1 say that

enter image description here

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ummm, can you give a reference as to where it says this? Never heard of this before now. –  JohnP Dec 21 '11 at 9:24
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@JohnP did you use visual studio ever? if not this question is not referenced you –  Artur Keyan Dec 21 '11 at 9:28
    
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3 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

It is allowed, but not necessarily in every situation.

An a element's content model is transparent, which means, its content model is the same as its parent's content model.

Respective a specification:

Content model:
Transparent, but there must be no interactive content descendant.

Respective img specification:

Contexts in which this element can be used:
Where embedded content is expected.

So if the content model of the a element's parent is phrasing content or embedded content, the img element is allowed:

As a general rule, elements whose content model allows any phrasing content should have either at least one descendant text node that is not inter-element whitespace, or at least one descendant element node that is embedded content.

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Great answer! thanx –  Artur Keyan Dec 21 '11 at 9:32
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It is indeed a valid construction. Are you perhaps using Visual Studio which is telling you this? Because it's a bug in the web standards of Visual Studio.

Get the web standards update here: http://visualstudiogallery.msdn.microsoft.com/a15c3ce9-f58f-42b7-8668-53f6cdc2cd83

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Your premise is incorrect; this is a perfectly valid construction.

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