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  var foo = {
    bar: function() { return this.baz; },
    baz: 1
  };
  (function(){
    return typeof arguments[0]();
  })(foo.bar);

Why does this code return undefined?

I would assume arguments[0] would hold the foo.bar, which is a function. When invoked via arguments[0]() it should return the result of the function evaluation in, this case 1. Hence, typeof arguments[0]() should return "Number" (like typeof 1). Instead, it returns undefined. Why?

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2  
Please change the accepted answer to the correct one (stackoverflow.com/a/8587945/995876) –  Esailija Jul 4 '12 at 8:53

4 Answers 4

up vote -2 down vote accepted

this refer to bar function itself.

var foo = {
    bar: function() {return foo.baz; },
    baz:1
  };
  (function(){
    return typeof arguments[0]();
  })(foo.bar);

fiddle : http://jsfiddle.net/W9Jqb/

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1  
It doesn't. The this keyword points to the execution context. In the given example, that's the scope of the anonymous function which calls it. Since that is itself called from the global scope, this simply points to the global window object. –  PPvG Dec 21 '11 at 10:04
1  
Would be embarrassing if we have a lot of functions in this object and we wanted to change the name of the foo:) –  abuduba Dec 21 '11 at 10:09
1  
Why is this the accepted answer? I thought the question was "why does this code return undefined?", not "Can you help me find an ugly hack to fix this?". –  PPvG Dec 23 '11 at 10:34

the code won't work because inside the anonymous function you lose the reference to this.baz of foo object when used in another context

you can use the apply() method to redefine the context, like so

var foo = {
   bar: function() { return this.baz; },
   baz: 1
};

(function(){
   return arguments[0].apply(foo);
})(foo.bar);

and this returns correctly 1 because apply() method change the execution context to the object passed as argument

typeof arguments[0].apply(foo);

returns numberas expected

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return typeof arguments[0].apply(foo);I guess this was what you meant. I see the handiness of apply and significance of execution context coming into picture. –  Vikram Bhaskaran Dec 21 '11 at 9:59

To understand why this is not a reference to the object on which the function resides, you have to understand that JavaScript doesn't have classes. It has functions.

In JavaScript, functions are never strictly "bound" to objects like they are in classful languages like Java, C#, whatever. A javascript function is just another type, like string and number, which means that you can pass functions around in variables like any other type. In your example, the function contained in foo.bar isn't aware of foo at all. It's just a function, minding its own business.

So what does the this keyword do? It points to the execution context. In your example, you call the function inside foo.bar from the global scope (i.e. window), so that's what it points to. You can use apply() to call the function in the correct scope, but for that you would need access to that scope (in this case, the foo object). This negates any of the security advantages of passing along just the function, without the object.

To "fix" this "problem", ECMAScript 5 (the future version of JavaScript) introduces bind(). This handy function lets you bind a function to a certain execution scope before passing it to another function, like this:

var foo = {
    bar: function() { return this.baz; },
    baz: 1
};

var callback = foo.bar.bind(foo);

(function(){
    return typeof arguments[0]();
}(callback));
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Also, note that bind() will actually work in most modern browsers, today: jsfiddle.net/54dzA. Except we can't use it yet, because IE 6 doesn't support it. Or IE 7. Or IE 8. –  PPvG Dec 21 '11 at 10:50

You can reffering to foo by this statement.

You should write a wrapper like below which will very helpfull if will we wanted to change the name of the foo when we will have a lot of function in foo

var foo = {
    bar: function() { return this.baz; },
    baz: 1
  };

(function(a){
 for( var i in a){ 
    if( typeof a[i] === "function" ){

      a[i] = (function(f){  
            return function(){
                return f.apply(a,arguments);
            }
      })(a[i])
    }
 }
})(foo);

  (function(){
    return typeof arguments[0]();
  })(foo.bar);
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