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I would like to provide encapsulation of actions/methods generically. I think this should be possible in C# but I'm not able to produce it so it compiles...

The following briefly demonstrates what I want. Is this possible somehow, perhaps by generalizing the class?

Required is:

  • I want to execute the function/action (see method type) and 'do something' when an error occurs
  • I want to return the value of the function if the method is a function (otherwise return void if possible)
  • I want to 'do something' if the return type of the function is a boolean and the value is false.

    public class Encapsulator {
        private Action _action;
        private Func<T> _function;
        private MethodType _type; //Action || Function
    
        public Encapsulator(Action action) {
            this._action = action;
            this._type = MethodType.Action;
        }
        public Encapsulator(Func<T> func) { //This is not accepted
            this._function = func;
            this._type = MethodType.Function;        
        }
    
        public void Execute() {
            try {
                this._action();
            }
            catch(Exception ex) {
                //do something
                throw;
            }
        }
    
        public T Execute<T>() {
            try {
                var r = this._function();
    
                if(typeof(r) == bool) {
                    if(!r)
                      //do something
                }
    
                return r;
    
            } catch(Exception ex) {
                //do something
                throw;
            }
        }
    }
    
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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

New Approach: The action Encapsulator will now return a dummy result (always true).

public class Encapsulator
{
    public static Encapsulator<bool> CreateEncapsulator(Action action)
    {
        return new Encapsulator<bool>(() =>
            {
                action();
                return true;
            });
    }

    public static Encapsulator<T> CreateEncapsulator<T>(Func<T> func)
    {
        return new Encapsulator<T>(func);
    }
}

public class Encapsulator<T>
{
    private Func<T> _function;

    internal Encapsulator(Func<T> func)
    {
        this._function = func;
    }

    public T Execute()
    {
        try
        {
            object res = this._function();
            Nullable<bool> bres = res as Nullable<bool>;

            if (bres.HasValue)
            {
                if (!bres.Value)
                    Console.WriteLine("NOT TRUE!");
                //do something
            }

            return (T)res;

        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            //do something
            throw;
        }
    }
}

Calling the code:

var withDummyReturn = Encapsulator.CreateEncapsulator(() => Console.WriteLine("Great"));
withDummyReturn.Execute();
var withReturn = Encapsulator.CreateEncapsulator<bool>(() => true);
bool res = withReturn.Execute();
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This looks alright. Instantiating for Func<T> with type argument works: var x = new Encapsulator<bool>(f);. But how do I instantiate with the Action parameter without a type argument in the class? var y = new Encapsulator(a); doesn't work because it expects a type argument. –  Ropstah Dec 21 '11 at 13:50

Your second constructor won't compile because their are no generics applied to the type at the higher level:

public Encapsulator<T>
{  
    public Encapsulator(Func<T> func)
    { 
        this._function = func;
        this._type = MethodType.Function;  
    }      
}

Instead of just introducing new things within the parameters of a method, essentially, we need to specify that those things are 'available' for utilisation in the definitions. So, for instance, if you were trying to add a specific generic method, you could apply it as you have done, but would instead need to do (something which you demonstrate with the Execute method):

public void MyGenericMethod<T>(Func<T> func)
{ 

} 

Noting the first T, we're specifying the existence of T, as such.

There are possibly more issues at hand with your code here, but I believe, on first glance, this to be the crux of the problems you're having.

As for returning variable types, the best you might hope for is returning a plain old object. Or, making use of the dynamic type, however, I wouldn't have thought this would be the way to go and wouldn't recommend it; you can't flip return type from an actual type to a void, though.

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But what needs to be provided as type argument for the Action scenario when there is no return value..? –  Ropstah Dec 21 '11 at 11:14

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