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MSDN documentation for classes contain many inherited properties and methods. I think this is clutter and greatly reduces the usability.

For example, take look here, at the BitmapSource class. You can't really see what's special about this class. Everying is inherited, inherited, inherited.

It think that if something is inherited then it should be doucmented at the BASE class. So if a Mamnal BreastFeeds and a Dog Barks, I would go to the documenation of Mammal for breast feeding (anyhow, to read about it :), and for that of Dog for barking. Of course, if something is over-ridden, it should also appear at the derived class's documentation such as in BitmapSource.Height.

So: Is there a way to view MSDN documentation hiding the inherited clutter? Some variation on the Url, a switch, offline help, a utility?

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I have no idea what this rant is talking about. As you mention, if something is overridden, it appears in the derived class's documentation, much like BitmapSource.Height. See here. –  Cody Gray Dec 21 '11 at 11:45
    
@CodyGray My "rant" isn't about missing things. It's about redundant things. Why clutter "Dog"'s description with all the methods and properties derived from Mammal, it they are not overridden? They already appear once, at Mammal's documentation. I want a way to filter them out, so I can focus on what makes Dog a special type of Mammal (e.g. RollOnYourBackAndLetMeRubYourBelly) –  Avi Dec 21 '11 at 14:45

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OK, found the solution: Visual Studio's Object Browser. SO much more understandable!

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Only problme - doesn't have all of MSDN documentation, e.g. remarks and exmaples. Best tool would include features of both. –  Avi Dec 25 '11 at 18:46

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