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I'm using VS2008 (so I have TR1, but no C++11), and I don't use boost. The description that follows is a simplified version of my real problem.

I have the following class hierarchy: an interface, an abstract class that implements it and several classes derived from that abstract class:

struct IMyInterface
{
    virtual void MinMax(int& Min, int& Max)const = 0;
};

class Base : public IMyInterface // Abstract
{
// ...
};

class A: public Base
{
public:
    virtual void MinMax(int& Min, int& Max)const { // Some stuff for A}
// ...
};

class B: public Base
{
public:
    virtual void MinMax(int& Min, int& Max)const { // Some stuff for B}
// ...
};

Then I have a vector of shared_ptr to the Base class:

// Somewhere in my code
typedef shared_ptr<Base> Base_sp;

vector<Base_sp> v;

And I have some code that does this:

int Vmin = INT_MAX;
int Vmax = INT_MIN;
for(vector<Base_sp>::const_iterator it = v_sp.begin(); it != v_sp.end(); ++it)
{
    int v1, v2;
    (*it)->MinMax(v1, v2);

    Vmin = std::min(v1, Vmin);
    Vmax = std::max(v2, Vmax);
}

I use similar code in more than one place so I've taken it out to a function I run through accumulate:

pair<int, int> MinMaxFinder(pair<int, int> vals, Base_sp elem)
{
    int Vmin = vals.first;
    int Vmax = vals.second;

    if (elem)
    {
        int v1, v2;
        elem->MinMax(v1, v2);

        Vmin = std::min(v1, Vmin);
        Vmax = std::max(v2, Vmax);
    }
    return make_pair(Vmin, Vmax);
}


pair<int, int> tmp = accumulate(v_sp.begin(), v_sp.end(), 
                                make_pair(INT_MAX, INT_MIN), &MinMaxFinder);
int Vmin = tmp.first;
int Vmax = tmp.second;

This works fine, but, in the other places where I use the code I want to replace, I do not necessarily use Base_sp-derived classes, but other IMyInterface-derived classes. So I would like to declare MinMaxFinder like this:

pair<int, int> MinMaxFinder(pair<int, int> vals, IMyInterface* elem)

But that, of course, doesn't compile.

So, is there a way, through an adapter or something, to do what I want? If not, any ideas on how to tackle this?

share|improve this question
    
By "I don't use boost", do you mean that you don't currently use it, but would if it solved your problem; or do you mean that for some reason you can't or don't want to use it at all? –  Mike Seymour Dec 21 '11 at 12:00
    
I don't currently use it, and due to our "peculiar" organization, it would be a PITA to start using it, though I see it has lots of useful things. –  MikMik Dec 21 '11 at 12:28

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You could parametrise the function over the type of pointer used:

template <typename MyInterfacePointer>
pair<int, int> MinMaxFinder(pair<int, int> vals, MyInterfacePointer elem)
{
    // Function body is identical to yours
    int Vmin = vals.first;
    int Vmax = vals.second;

    if (elem)
    {
        int v1, v2;
        elem->MinMax(v1, v2);

        Vmin = std::min(v1, Vmin);
        Vmax = std::max(v2, Vmax);
    }
    return make_pair(Vmin, Vmax);
}

vector<Base_sp> v_sp;   
accumulate(v_sp.begin(), v_sp.end(), 
           make_pair(INT_MAX, INT_MIN), &MinMaxFinder<Base_sp>);

vector<IMyInterface*> v_i;
accumulate(v_i.begin(), v_i.end(), 
           make_pair(INT_MAX, INT_MIN), &MinMaxFinder<IMyInterface*>);

For convenience, this could be further wrapped in a function parametrised by the container type:

template <typename MyInterfacePointerContainer>
pair<int, int> FindMinMax(MyInterfacePointerContainer const & c)
{
    return accumulate(c.begin(), c.end(), make_pair(INT_MAX, INT_MIN),
        &MinMaxFinder<typename MyInterfacePointerContainer::value_type>);
}

vector<Base_sp> v_sp;
FindMinMax(v_sp);

vector<IMyInterface*> v_i;
FindMinMax(v_i);
share|improve this answer
    
+1 was about to suggest same approach. –  hmjd Dec 21 '11 at 12:20
    
Thanks! I think I have to take a deeper look at templates. The other day I posted another question an the solution was mostly the same. –  MikMik Dec 21 '11 at 12:25

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