Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Hello I have often experience while developing my web applications that pressing F5 or doesn't produce or refresh the proper result. But when we hit CTRL+F5 it genrates the correct result. What is the basic difference between simple F5 and CTRL+F5? I have often also experienced that pressing simple F5 and pressing the refresh button on browser also generate different results.

Can any body tell me what is the basic difference among all these requests.

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 8 down vote accepted

CTRL+F5 forces the Cache to clear. hence generating the correct result.

share|improve this answer
F5 is a standard page reload.

and

CTRL + F5 refreshes the page by clearing the cached content of the page.

**Having cursor in the address field
 and pressing ENTER will also do the same as CTRL + F5**
share|improve this answer

I did small research regarding this topic and found different behavior for the browsers:

enter image description here

See my blog post "Behind refresh button" for more details.

share|improve this answer
    
The blog post link changed to podlipensky.com/2012/03/behind-refresh-button –  Mottie Apr 16 '13 at 15:04

F5 and the refresh button will look at your browser cache before asking the server for content.

Ctrl + F5 forces a load from the server.

You can set content expiration headers and/or meta tags to ensure the browser doesn't cache anything (perhaps something you can do only for the development environment).

share|improve this answer

F5 triggers a standard reload.

Ctrl + F5 triggers a forced reload. This causes the browser to re-download the page from the web server, ensuring that it always has the latest copy.

Unlike with F5, a forced reload does not display a cached copy of the page.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.