Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How do I convert a java.io.File to a byte[]?

share|improve this question
    
One use that I can think of is reading serialized objects from file. –  Mahm00d Apr 9 at 15:34
    
Another is to find the file type using the header. –  James Poulson May 11 at 18:45

15 Answers 15

up vote 147 down vote accepted

It depends on what best means for you. Productivity wise, don't reinvent the wheel and use Apache Commons. Which is here IOUtils.toByteArray(InputStream input).

share|improve this answer
5  
given the examples below, correctness-wise as well ... –  kdgregory May 13 '09 at 16:50
16  
Or if you're a Guava consumer, ByteStreams.toByteArray(InputStream). guava-libraries.googlecode.com/svn/trunk/javadoc/com/google/… –  Brian Harris Jan 28 '10 at 2:11
23  
Guava has a Files.toByteArray(File file) method. –  rado Apr 20 '12 at 21:27
37  
or use any standard 3-lines solution instead of a reinventing-the-wheel-dependency as a lib –  ymajoros Jun 8 '12 at 15:07
5  
@ymajoros: So true! I'd rather have some extra lines of code than yet another dependency. Dependencies have hidden costs. You need to stay up to date with that library, include the dependency in your build scripting etc, communicate it to people using your code etc etc. If you are already using a library that has code for it than use that, otherwsie I would say write it yourself. –  Stijn de Witt Feb 5 '13 at 12:44

In JDK 7 you can use Files.readAllBytes(Path).

Example:

import java.nio.file.Files;
import java.nio.file.Paths;
import java.nio.file.Path;

Path path = Paths.get("path/to/file");
byte[] data = Files.readAllBytes(path);
share|improve this answer
68  
+1. This doesn't require third-party libraries –  rusticbit Jun 5 '13 at 8:41
1  
Very helpful and easy to use, thanks! –  Thiago Ruiz Aug 22 '13 at 23:31
    
I have a File object, not a path (from http post request) –  aldo.roman.nurena Oct 28 '13 at 18:02
12  
@aldo.roman.nurena JDK7 introduced a File.toPath() method that will give you a Path Object. –  KevinL Oct 30 '13 at 18:20
    
I'm already using it. I was about to comment that out the same day but my internet connection failed. Thanks and voted up! –  aldo.roman.nurena Nov 1 '13 at 6:06
RandomAccessFile f = new RandomAccessFile(fileName, "r");
byte[] b = new byte[(int)f.length()];
f.read(b);
share|improve this answer
1  
You have to check return value of f.read(). Here can sometimes happen, that you will not read whole file. –  bugs_ Sep 20 '12 at 9:40
7  
Such situation can occur only if file is changing while you are reading it. In all other cases IOException is thrown. To address this problem I suggest to open file in read-write mode: RandomAccessFile(fileName, "rw") –  Dmitry Mitskevich Sep 20 '12 at 10:26
3  
I could imagine other sources for only reading a portion of the file (File is on a network share ...) readFully() has the contract you're searching for. –  DThought May 3 '13 at 8:08
3  
Remember that RandomAccessFile is not thread safe. So, synchronization may be needed in some cases. –  bancer May 16 '13 at 22:57
    
@DmitryMitskevich There are other cases as well, on filesystems that are possibly non-conformat. e.g. reading "files" in /proc/ on linux can cause short reads (i.e. you need a loop to read it all) –  nos Nov 12 '13 at 21:15

Basically you have to read it in memory. Open the file, allocate the array, and read the contents from the file into the array.

The simplest way is something similar to this:

public byte[] read(File file) throws IOException, FileTooBigException {

    if ( file.length() > MAX_FILE_SIZE ) {
        throw new FileTooBigException(file);
    }
    ByteArrayOutputStream ous = null;
    InputStream ios = null;
    try {
        byte[] buffer = new byte[4096];
        ous = new ByteArrayOutputStream();
        ios = new FileInputStream(file);
        int read = 0;
        while ( (read = ios.read(buffer)) != -1 ) {
            ous.write(buffer, 0, read);
        }
    } finally { 
        try {
             if ( ous != null ) 
                 ous.close();
        } catch ( IOException e) {
        }

        try {
             if ( ios != null ) 
                  ios.close();
        } catch ( IOException e) {
        }
    }
    return ous.toByteArray();
}

This has some unnecessary copying of the file content (actually the data is copied three times: from file to buffer, from buffer to ByteArrayOutputStream, from ByteArrayOutputStream to the actual resulting array).

You also need to make sure you read in memory only files up to a certain size (this is usually application dependent) :-).

You also need to treat the IOException outside the function.

Another way is this:

public byte[] read(File file) throws IOException, FileTooBigException {

    if ( file.length() > MAX_FILE_SIZE ) {
        throw new FileTooBigException(file);
    }


    byte []buffer = new byte[(int) file.length()];
    InputStream ios = null;
    try {
        ios = new FileInputStream(file);
        if ( ios.read(buffer) == -1 ) {
            throw new IOException("EOF reached while trying to read the whole file");
        }        
    } finally { 
        try {
             if ( ios != null ) 
                  ios.close();
        } catch ( IOException e) {
        }
    }

    return buffer;
}

This has no unnecessary copying.

FileTooBigException is a custom application exception. The MAX_FILE_SIZE constant is an application parameters.

For big files you should probably think a stream processing algorithm or use memory mapping (see java.nio).

share|improve this answer
    
ios needs to be declared outside the try –  Daryl Spitzer Nov 11 '10 at 3:35
7  
ahh simplicity wins ! –  Sankalp Aug 7 '12 at 17:10
    
One example with java.nio for larger files would be good. –  Ahamed Oct 10 '12 at 17:42
    
great answer, thanks! –  lamostreta Jan 21 '13 at 21:24
    
The statement "ios.read(buffer)" in the second example will only read in the first 4096 bytes of the file (assuming same 4k buffer as used in first example). For the second example to work, I think the read has to be inside a while loop that checks the result for -1 (end of file reached). –  Stijn de Witt Feb 5 '13 at 12:48

As someone said, Apache Commons File Utils might have what you are looking for

public static byte[] readFileToByteArray(File file) throws IOException
share|improve this answer
8  
Or you use Google Guave: byte[] Files.toByteArray(File file): guava-libraries.googlecode.com/svn/tags/release08/javadoc/com/… –  Kdeveloper Feb 22 '11 at 14:27
    
That should've been the accepted answer, thanks! –  theMarceloR Jul 29 at 14:55

You can use the NIO api as well to do it. I could do this with this code as long as the total file size (in bytes) would fit in an int.

    File f = new File("c:\\wscp.script");
    FileInputStream fin = null;
    FileChannel ch = null;
    try {
        fin = new FileInputStream(f);
        ch = fin.getChannel();
        int size = (int) ch.size();
        MappedByteBuffer buf = ch.map(MapMode.READ_ONLY, 0, size);
        byte[] bytes = new byte[size];
        buf.get(bytes);

    } catch (IOException e) {
        // TODO Auto-generated catch block
        e.printStackTrace();
    } finally {
        try {
            if (fin != null) {
                fin.close();
            }
            if (ch != null) {
                ch.close();
            }
        } catch (IOException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }

I think its very fast since its using MappedByteBuffer.

share|improve this answer
    
I've never used FileChannel's before, but that's a good idea... –  Powerlord May 13 '09 at 16:59
2  
there is absolutely no need to use memory mapping if you are only going to read the file once, and it will end up using twice as much memory as using a normal FileInputStream. –  james May 13 '09 at 17:04
1  
Unfortunately MappedByteBuffer isn't automatically released. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline May 13 '09 at 17:04
2  
awesome, the new example includes printStackTrace, classic broken exception handling. –  james May 13 '09 at 17:07
    
I agree.. Its the default stuff that eclipse puts in. I think I should rethrow the exception ! –  Amit May 13 '09 at 17:11

Simplest Way for reading bytes from file

import java.io.*;
class ReadBytesFromFile{
public static void main(String args[])throws Exception{


/// getBytes from anyWhere
// I'm getting byte array from File
File file=null;
FileInputStream fileStream=new FileInputStream(file=new File("ByteArrayInputStreamClass.java"));

    // Instantiate array
    byte []arr= new byte[(int)file.length()];

    /// read All bytes of File stream
    fileStream.read(arr,0,arr.length);

    for (int X : arr){
        System.out.print((char)X);
    }


}
}
share|improve this answer
// Returns the contents of the file in a byte array.
    public static byte[] getBytesFromFile(File file) throws IOException {        
        // Get the size of the file
        long length = file.length();

        // You cannot create an array using a long type.
        // It needs to be an int type.
        // Before converting to an int type, check
        // to ensure that file is not larger than Integer.MAX_VALUE.
        if (length > Integer.MAX_VALUE) {
            // File is too large
            throw new IOException("File is too large!");
        }

        // Create the byte array to hold the data
        byte[] bytes = new byte[(int)length];

        // Read in the bytes
        int offset = 0;
        int numRead = 0;

        InputStream is = new FileInputStream(file);
        try {
            while (offset < bytes.length
                   && (numRead=is.read(bytes, offset, bytes.length-offset)) >= 0) {
                offset += numRead;
            }
        } finally {
            is.close();
        }

        // Ensure all the bytes have been read in
        if (offset < bytes.length) {
            throw new IOException("Could not completely read file "+file.getName());
        }
        return bytes;
    }
share|improve this answer
9  
That doesn't close the stream, if an exception happens. –  Esko Luontola May 13 '09 at 16:34
    
Agreed. Always always always close streams in a finally! –  Neil Coffey May 13 '09 at 16:40
    
Updated with better exception handling. –  Cuga May 13 '09 at 16:49
    
Also, put numRead inside the loop. Declare variables in the smallest valid scope you can. Putting it outside the while loop is only necessary to enable that complicated "while" test; it would be better to do the test for EOF inside the loop (and throw an EOFException if it occurs). –  erickson May 13 '09 at 16:50
    
The exception handling now is just odd. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline May 13 '09 at 17:06

Guava has Files.toByteArray() to offer you. It has several advantages:

  1. It covers the corner case where files report a length of 0 but still have content
  2. It's highly optimized, you get a OutOfMemoryException if trying to read in a big file before even trying to load the file. (Through clever use of file.length())
  3. You don't have to reinvent the wheel.
share|improve this answer

If you want to read bytes into a pre-allocated byte buffer, this answer may help.

Your first guess would probably be to use InputStream read(byte[]). However, this method has a flaw that makes it unreasonably hard to use: there is no guarantee that the array will actually be completely filled, even if no EOF is encountered.

Instead, take a look at DataInputStream readFully(byte[]). This is a wrapper for input streams, and does not have the above mentioned issue. Additionally, this method throws when EOF is encountered. Much nicer.

share|improve this answer

Let me add another solution without using third-party libraries. It re-uses an exception handling pattern that was proposed by Scott (link). And I moved the ugly part into a separate message (I would hide in some FileUtils class ;) )

public void someMethod() {
    final byte[] buffer = read(new File("test.txt"));
}

private byte[] read(final File file) {
    if (file.isDirectory())
    	throw new RuntimeException("Unsupported operation, file "
    			+ file.getAbsolutePath() + " is a directory");
    if (file.length() > Integer.MAX_VALUE)
    	throw new RuntimeException("Unsupported operation, file "
    			+ file.getAbsolutePath() + " is too big");

    Throwable pending = null;
    FileInputStream in = null;
    final byte buffer[] = new byte[(int) file.length()];
    try {
    	in = new FileInputStream(file);
    	in.read(buffer);
    } catch (Exception e) {
    	pending = new RuntimeException("Exception occured on reading file "
    			+ file.getAbsolutePath(), e);
    } finally {
    	if (in != null) {
    		try {
    			in.close();
    		} catch (Exception e) {
    			if (pending == null) {
    				pending = new RuntimeException(
    					"Exception occured on closing file" 
                             + file.getAbsolutePath(), e);
    			}
    		}
    	}
    	if (pending != null) {
    		throw new RuntimeException(pending);
    	}
    }
    return buffer;
}
share|improve this answer

Using the same approach as the community wiki answer, but cleaner and compiling out of the box (preferred approach if you don't want to import Apache Commons libs, e.g. on Android):

public static byte[] getFileBytes(File file) throws IOException {
    ByteArrayOutputStream ous = null;
    InputStream ios = null;
    try {
        byte[] buffer = new byte[4096];
        ous = new ByteArrayOutputStream();
        ios = new FileInputStream(file);
        int read = 0;
        while ((read = ios.read(buffer)) != -1)
            ous.write(buffer, 0, read);
    } finally {
        try {
            if (ous != null)
                ous.close();
        } catch (IOException e) {
            // swallow, since not that important
        }
        try {
            if (ios != null)
                ios.close();
        } catch (IOException e) {
            // swallow, since not that important
        }
    }
    return ous.toByteArray();
}
share|improve this answer
public static byte[] readBytes(InputStream inputStream) throws IOException {
    byte[] buffer = new byte[32 * 1024];
    int bufferSize = 0;
    for (;;) {
        int read = inputStream.read(buffer, bufferSize, buffer.length - bufferSize);
        if (read == -1) {
            return Arrays.copyOf(buffer, bufferSize);
        }
        bufferSize += read;
        if (bufferSize == buffer.length) {
            buffer = Arrays.copyOf(buffer, bufferSize * 2);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Another Way for reading bytes from file

Reader reader = null;
    try {
        reader = new FileReader(file);
        char buf[] = new char[8192];
        int len;
        StringBuilder s = new StringBuilder();
        while ((len = reader.read(buf)) >= 0) {
            s.append(buf, 0, len);
            byte[] byteArray = s.toString().getBytes();
        }
    } catch(FileNotFoundException ex) {
    } catch(IOException e) {
    }
    finally {
        if (reader != null) {
            reader.close();
        }
    }
share|improve this answer

I belive this is the easiest way:

org.apache.commons.io.FileUtils.readFileToByteArray(file);
share|improve this answer
    
there is already an answer with this suggestion from Tom in 2009 –  Knut Herrmann Apr 3 at 12:27

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.