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Do you have an idea how to simplify this simple "translation-mechanism"?

Is a Hash-Table usefull?

    char translateChar(char strIn)
    {
        char strOut = '?';

        if (strIn == 'A') strOut = '1';
        else if (strIn == 'B') strOut = '2';
        else if (strIn == 'C') strOut = '3';
        else if (strIn == 'D') strOut = '4';
        else if (strIn == 'E') strOut = '5';
        else if (strIn == 'F') strOut = '6';
        else if (strIn == 'G') strOut = '7';
        else if (strIn == 'H') strOut = '8';
        else if (strIn == 'I') strOut = '9';
        else if (strIn == 'J') strOut = '@';
        else if (strIn == 'K') strOut = 'A';
        else if (strIn == 'L') strOut = 'B';
        else if (strIn == 'M') strOut = 'C';
        else if (strIn == 'N') strOut = 'D';
        else if (strIn == 'O') strOut = 'E';
        else if (strIn == 'P') strOut = 'F';
        else if (strIn == 'Q') strOut = 'G';
        else if (strIn == 'R') strOut = 'H';
        else if (strIn == 'S') strOut = 'I';
        else if (strIn == 'T') strOut = 'J';
        else if (strIn == 'U') strOut = 'K';
        else if (strIn == 'V') strOut = 'L';
        else if (strIn == 'W') strOut = 'M';
        else if (strIn == 'X') strOut = 'N';
        else if (strIn == 'Y') strOut = 'O';
        else if (strIn == 'Z') strOut = 'P';
        else if (strIn == '2') strOut = 'X';
        else if (strIn == '1') strOut = 'Y';
        else if (strIn == '_') strOut = '_';

        return strOut;
    }
share|improve this question

closed as too localized by Polynomial, Florian Greinacher, Darin Dimitrov, kdgregory, Tim Cooper Dec 22 '11 at 16:19

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
A dictionary is useful here definitely. –  Petar Minchev Dec 21 '11 at 13:35
    
as far as i know, a hashtable would surely do the job, but will save you just some characters of code. on the other hand, every character has to be searched in the hashtable. which means that this approach is maybe a little less clean but better performance wise (if you replace the strOut = 'x' with return 'x';) because that will cancel any further checks. –  Marnix v. R. Dec 21 '11 at 13:39
    
If you going to downvote, at least provide some explanation. The question is clearly asking for help to simplify the code. –  bluefeet Dec 21 '11 at 13:40
    
codereview.stackexchange.com –  Cody Gray Dec 21 '11 at 14:01
    
thanks Petar, thanks Marnix, thanks bluefeet!!! –  PeterP Dec 21 '11 at 14:21

6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I think this will help to you...

char[] strIN = { 'A', 'B', 'C', 'D', 'E', 'F', 'G', 'H', 'I', 'J', 'K', 'L', 'M', 'N', 'O', 'P', 'Q', 'R', 'S', 'T', 'U', 'V', 'W', 'X', 'Y', 'Z', '2', '1', '_' };
        char[] strOut = { '2', '3', '4', '5', '6', '7', '8', '9', '@', 'A', 'B', 'C', 'D', 'E', 'F', 'G', 'H', 'I', 'J', 'K', 'L', 'M', 'N', 'O', 'P', 'X', 'Y', '_' };


        char init = 'C';

        int index = Array.IndexOf(strIN, init);
        char output = strOut[index];
share|improve this answer
    
nice and simple! –  PeterP Dec 21 '11 at 16:11
    
If it help to you then please accept this answer.. Thanks. –  Manoj Savalia Dec 22 '11 at 10:50

Assuming ASCII encoding:

char translateChar(char strIn)
{
    if (strIn >= 'A' && strIn <= 'I') return strIn - 'A' + '1' ;
    if (strIn >= 'J' && strIn <= 'Z') return strIn - 'J' + '@' ;
    if (strIn == '2') return 'X';
    if (strIn == '1') return 'Y';
    if (strIn == '_') return '_';

    return '?';
}
share|improve this answer

Use a Dictionary<char, char> to map each strIn to its strOut value. You might want to make the dictionary a private field that you initialize in the constructor of the class.

public class MyClass
{
    private Dictionary<char, char> dict = new Dictionary<char, char>();

    public MyClass()
    {
        dict.Add('A', '1');
        dict.Add('B', '2');
        // ... and so on ...
    }

    public char TranslateChar(char input)
    {
        char result;
        if (dict.TryGetValue(input, out result))
        {
            return result;
        }
        return '?';
    }
}

Usage:

var myClass = new MyClass();
Console.WriteLine(myClass.TranslateChar('A'));
Console.WriteLine(myClass.TranslateChar('@'));

EDIT: in response to the comment, there's no built in way to determine the key for a particular value. To do so, you can use this approach:

char value = '@';
foreach (var kvp in dict)
{
    if (kvp.Value == value)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Key found: " + kvp.Key);
        break;
    }
}

Or, you can add a TryGetKey extension method that mimics TryGetValue:

public static class MyExtensions
{
    public static bool TryGetKey<TKey, TValue>(
        this IDictionary<TKey, TValue> dict,
        TValue value,
        out TKey key)
    {
        key = default(TKey);

        bool isKeyFound = false;
        foreach (var kvp in dict)
        {
            if (EqualityComparer<TValue>.Default.Equals(kvp.Value, value))
            {
                isKeyFound = true;
                key = kvp.Key;
                break;
            }
        }

        return isKeyFound;
    }
}

TryGetKey extension method usage:

char value = '@';
char keyResult;    
if (dict.TryGetKey(value, out keyResult))
{
    Console.WriteLine("Key found: " + keyResult);
}
else
{
    Console.WriteLine("Key doesn't exist for value: " + value);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much! –  PeterP Dec 21 '11 at 14:21
    
Btw. is it possible to use the dictionary in both directions? Can i get the Key from the value? –  PeterP Dec 21 '11 at 14:24
    
Rem, value need not be unique. So there is no direct API provided by Dictionary class for this. So you need to do a crude way. –  zenwalker Dec 21 '11 at 14:27
    
Thank you @zenwalker –  PeterP Dec 21 '11 at 14:50
    
@PeterP I've updated my response with a solution to get a key associated with a value. –  Ahmad Mageed Dec 21 '11 at 16:21

If you look at the input and the output of the function, you see some clear ranges: A-I, J, K-Z, 2, 1 and Y. If you use these in your if statements, your code will be simpler already. And even smaller than using a Dictionary and filling it.

share|improve this answer

You could use a Dictionary<char, char> like this:

private Dictionary<char, char> mTranslationMappings = new Dictionary<char, char>();

// ... in .ctor ...
mTranslationMappings.Add('2', 'X');
// ... add other mappings ...

char translateChar(char strIn)
{
    return mTranslationMappings[strIn];
}

This may not be the best approach, but it is a solution.

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Create a Dictionary<char,char>, populate it with your translations, then simply:

return (translationDictionary.ContainsKey(strIn))? translationDictionary[strIn] : null
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