Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

the input looks like that 8.7000000 and I want to format it to look like that 8.70 EUR. I considered using the DecimalFormat class:

    Double number = Double.valueOf(text);

    DecimalFormat dec = new DecimalFormat("#.## EUR");
    String credits = dec.format(number);

    TextView tt = (TextView) findViewById(R.id.creditsView);
    tt.setText(credits);

The result is 8,7 EUR. How can I tell the formatter to have two digits after the ,?

share|improve this question
3  
In general, you shouldn't be using binary floating point types to store currency values anyway. Use BigDecimal or just scale an integer (e.g. have an integer number of cents). –  Jon Skeet Dec 21 '11 at 13:49

2 Answers 2

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Also want to highlight here Jon Skeet's point about using integer to store all your currency - don't want to be dealing with floating point errors in money.

use .00 instead of .## - 0 means a digit, # means a digit (But hide it if it's equal to zero)

Double number = Double.valueOf(text);

DecimalFormat dec = new DecimalFormat("#.00 EUR");
String credits = dec.format(number);

TextView tt = (TextView) findViewById(R.id.creditsView);
tt.setText(credits);

or

use setMinimumFractionDigits?

  Double number = Double.valueOf(text);

    DecimalFormat dec = new DecimalFormat("#.## EUR");
    dec.setMinimumFractionDigits(2);
    String credits = dec.format(number);

    TextView tt = (TextView) findViewById(R.id.creditsView);
    tt.setText(credits);
share|improve this answer
    
perfect, thank you! –  artworkad シ Dec 21 '11 at 13:44
    
How would the format look like if I have 0.0600 as input and want 6,0 ct as output? –  artworkad シ Dec 21 '11 at 13:47
    
You'd have to do that in code I'm afraid - the Decimal format wouldn't cope with changing the unit. I guess have a condition `if (val < 1 && val > 0){ //multiply by 100 and use ct formatter } else { //use eur formatter } –  Matt Fellows Dec 21 '11 at 13:48
    
thank you, everything works now :) –  artworkad シ Dec 21 '11 at 13:52
    
Did you see the point about using integers? It's a good idea. Using floats, or doubles, will lead to errors. –  Matt Fellows Dec 21 '11 at 13:57

I found a nice solution in this link below

http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/i18n/format/decimalFormat.html

in short to represent a currency like 92323345465.30 as 92,323,345,465.30 just use ###,###,###,###.00

That is, whenever you use '0', then the '0' will either be replaced by another digit, or if there is no digit to replace it, then IT WILL APPEAR! But is you use '#' then if there is no number to replace the '#', then that space will be empty.

Remember that you can even add up your own symbols like $, etc in front of the formatting or even after the formatting string

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.