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I have an IP address, say 192.168.1.1, that I want to match.

I have a file called afile that looks like this

 item1, item2, 192.168.1.1
 item3, item4, 192.168.1.10
 item5, item6, 192.168.2.1

If I do grep "192.168.1.1" afile both the first and second lines of afile are matched, which is not what I want.

I'm aware of plenty of regular expressions that will match any IP address, but I'm not aware of any regular expressions that match a particular IP address.

Any help with this is appreciated.

What if the IP address isn't on the end of the line? For example, what if columns two and three were swapped in my example file?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You need to add a $ to the end of the regex, to make it match the end of the line. I would also suggest escaping the dots, as a . in a regex means "match any character". So your regex would become:

grep "192\.168\.1\.1$" afile
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It looks like you answered first. –  devin Dec 21 '11 at 15:15
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You want to match end of line after the last one. Try this :

grep "192.168.1.1$"
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grep is an abbreviated version of g/re/p where "re" is a regular expression. In RegEx, a period means "Any character". To make it a literal period, escape it with a backslash.

grep "192\.168\.1\.1$" afile

As others said, you also need to say it ends the line.

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I don't need to escape the periods since the expression is in quotes. "192.168.1.1" works just as well as 192\.168\.1\.1 –  devin Dec 21 '11 at 15:14
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@devin, I checked just to be sure. If you don't escape them, your pattern will match "item1, item2, 192T168Q1]1", quotes or not. –  FakeRainBrigand Dec 21 '11 at 16:04
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