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Background: I have a payroll system where leave is paid only if it falls in range of the invoice being paid. So if the invoice covers the last 2 weeks then only leave in the last 2 weeks is to paid.

I want to write a sql query to select the leave.

Assume a table called DailyLeaveLedger which has among others a LeaveDate and Paid flag. Assume a table called Invoice that was a WeekEnding field and a NumberWeeksCovered field.

Now assume week ending date 15/05/09 and NumberWeeksCovered = 2 and a LeaveDate of 11/05/09.

This is an example of how I want it written. The actual query is quite complex but I want the LeaveDate check to be a In subquery.

SELECT * 
FROM DailyLeaveLedger 
WHERE Paid = 0 AND
      LeaveDate IN (SELECT etc...What should this be to do this)

Not sure if its possible the way I mention?

Malcolm

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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

So LeaveDate should be between (WeekEnding-NoOfWeeksCovered) and (WeekEnding) for some Invoice?

If I've understood it right, you might be able to use an EXISTS() subquery, something like this:

SELECT * 
FROM DailyLeaveLedger dl
WHERE Paid = 0 AND
      EXISTS (SELECT *
              FROM Invoice i
              WHERE DateAdd(week,-i.NumberOfWeeksCovered,i.WeekEnding) < dl.LeaveDate 
              AND i.WeekEnding > dl.LeaveDate
              /* and an extra clause in here to make sure
              the invoice is for the same person as the dailyleaveledger row */
              )
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That looks what I need I will test it out, thanks. –  Malcolm May 13 '09 at 18:09
    
Anyone looking at this be careful about inclusive or exclusive endpoints... probably >= or <= will be required somewhere, not just > and < –  ErikE Sep 12 '10 at 21:29

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