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Is there any way in Java to get the compile time type of a reference at runtime?

Example:

private void doSomething(final Object o)
{
   // do somthing
}

final Number n = 1; 
doSomething(n);

final Object o = 1; 
doSomething(o);

final Integer i = 1; 
doSomething(i);

1st call --> Number

2nd call --> Object

3rd call --> Integer

Edit: This is a very simplified version of the problem. What i am trying to do is to detect(instead of being told) inside a framework metadata about objects being passed. What could happen is, that the method gets first called with an Integer and then with a Double, both declared as Number.

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1  
getClass()? Maybe check out the API. –  Dave Newton Dec 21 '11 at 17:03
1  
@Dave Newton that would return Integer not Number. –  Stefan Dec 21 '11 at 17:03
2  
That is not possible. –  SLaks Dec 21 '11 at 17:05
    
It's at least partially possible; see my answer. Although I'm not sure why you need to know the compile-time type. –  Dave Newton Dec 21 '11 at 17:23
    
@Dave Newton because i can use that information to generate meta data without passing that information explicitly to the framework. –  Stefan Dec 21 '11 at 17:33

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The only way I see is to use overloading. But you would need to specify a overlading method for each class of the inheritance relation to exclude sub classes.

private void doSomething(final Object o)
{
   // do something
}

private void doSomething(final Number n)
{
   // do something
}

private void doSomething(final Integer i)
{
   // do something
}

final Number n = 1;
doSomething(n); // doSomething(final Number) is called.
share|improve this answer
    
I was afraid i had to use overloading, but i may be able to limit the types and then have the code generated. –  Stefan Dec 21 '11 at 17:21
    
This may not be that bad after all. I could create Interfaces for supported Datatypes and then use a Proxy/Handler to put the meta data handling code into it. Clients could even create their own interfaces and the generic InvocationHandler would still work. –  Stefan Dec 21 '11 at 17:47

Quite simply, you can't.

You already know the compile-time of the function argument (Object) and you can find out the run-time type of the object that's passed in (by using getClass()). However, there's no way to get the information you're asking for.

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Use object.getClass()

private static void doSomething(final Object o) {
    System.out.println(o.getClass().getSuperclass());
}

private static <T extends Number> void doSomething(final T o) {
    System.out.println(o.getClass());
}


final Integer n = 2;
doSomething(n);

final Double n = 2D;
doSomething(n);
share|improve this answer
    
That returns Integer not Number. –  Stefan Dec 21 '11 at 17:11
    
@Stefan, see my answer - you can't have an instance of Number because Number is an abstract class. –  Paul Dec 21 '11 at 17:14
    
@Paul see my edit –  Stefan Dec 21 '11 at 17:18
    
@Stefan if you put getSuperclass() will get Number, class that inherits Integer. –  Jhonathan Dec 21 '11 at 17:25
    
@Jhonathan But i dont know its the direct super class. If n was declared as Object it wouldnt work. –  Stefan Dec 21 '11 at 17:27

you can use 'instanceof'

public class Test {
  private static void doSomething(final Object o){
    if(o instanceof Number){
      System.out.println("it's a number!");
    }
    System.out.println("canonical class : "+o.getClass().getCanonicalName());
  }
  public static void main(String[] args) {
    Number n = new Integer(10);
    doSomething(n);
  }
}

prints out

it's a number!
canonical class : java.lang.Integer

Another option is to recursively check superclasses

public class Test {
  private static Class<?> doSomething(final Object o){
    // assuming o is not null
    Class<?> klass = getSuperClass(o.getClass());
    return klass;
  }

  private static Class<?> getSuperClass(Class<?> klass){
    // if super class is object or null break recursion
    if(klass.getSuperclass() == null || klass.getSuperclass().equals(Object.class)){
      return klass;
    }
    // keep looking higher up 
    return getSuperClass(klass.getSuperclass());
  }

  public static void main(String[] args) {
    Number n = new Integer(10);
    System.out.println("n  is a "+doSomething(n).getCanonicalName());
    Object o = new Integer(10);
    System.out.println("o  is a "+doSomething(o).getCanonicalName());
    Number d = new Double(10.0d);
    System.out.println("d  is a "+doSomething(d).getCanonicalName());
    String s = "10";
    System.out.println("s  is a "+doSomething(s).getCanonicalName());
    Object so = "10";
    System.out.println("so is a "+doSomething(so).getCanonicalName());
  }
}

prints out

n  is a java.lang.Number
o  is a java.lang.Number
d  is a java.lang.Number
s  is a java.lang.String
so is a java.lang.String
share|improve this answer
    
See edit. I dont know what objects are being passed. Im trying to 'detect' the compile time type. –  Stefan Dec 21 '11 at 17:19
    
In that case I would recommend method overloading and see which method is actually called. –  cyber-monk Dec 21 '11 at 18:09
    
I am going to try the overloading. –  Stefan Dec 21 '11 at 18:17

You can't. Integer is the correct answer, because Number is an abstract class and you can't have an instance of an abstract class, and you relied on autoboxing to convert the primitive int.

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It doesnt matter if its abstract. Im trying to get the compile time type, which is indeed Number. See edit. –  Stefan Dec 21 '11 at 17:16
    
You can't have an instance, but you can have a reference; that's what is-a is all about. –  Dave Newton Dec 21 '11 at 17:25
    
@DaveNewton, an instance is a reference. In Java, passing the instance to another method is just passing the reference (vice passing by value). –  Paul Dec 21 '11 at 17:55
1  
@Paul OP is trying to determine if something is declared as a Number. An Integer is-a Number. You cannot instantiate a Number. You can declare a reference as a Number even though you cannot instantiate one directly. An instance is an instance, and may be referred to by types that cannot be directly instantiated. Is-a. You can have an instance of Number, as-an Integer. My point was to differentiate between things-that-are-directly-instantiable, and things-that-may-used-as-reference-types. –  Dave Newton Dec 21 '11 at 18:04

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