Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Let's say I have a Fraction class:

class Fraction {
    ...

    /** Invert current fraction */
    public Fraction inverse() {
        return new Fraction(den,num);
    }

    ...
}

And this is what the bytecode of the above method turns out to be:

 0 new #1 <xyzTestes/system/fraction/Fraction>
 3 dup
 4 aload_0
 5 getfield #16 <xyzTestes/system/fraction/Fraction.den>
 8 aload_0
 9 getfield #14 <xyzTestes/system/fraction/Fraction.num>
12 invokespecial #27 <xyzTestes/system/fraction/Fraction.<init>>
15 areturn

I'm trying to understand why instruction at position 3 was put there in the first place. I'd say we'd only need to do the following to make it work:

 new #1 <xyzTestes/system/fraction/Fraction>
 aload_0
 getfield #16 <xyzTestes/system/fraction/Fraction.den>
 aload_0
 getfield #14 <xyzTestes/system/fraction/Fraction.num>
 invokespecial #27 <xyzTestes/system/fraction/Fraction.<init>>
 areturn

Why is not so?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

When the bytecode for the constructor starts, there is no Fraction object. The new instruction allocates a Fraction object (uninitialized) from the heap and leaves a reference to it on the stack. The dup instruction is so that one reference can be used to call <init> and the second used for the areturn at the end.

share|improve this answer
    
invokespecial won't put a reference to the Fraction on the stack, then? –  devoured elysium Dec 21 '11 at 18:41
4  
@devoured elysium <init>()V returns void not Fraction. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Dec 21 '11 at 18:45
    
Meh, you are right. –  devoured elysium Dec 21 '11 at 18:45
    
+1 for the short and simple explanation. –  biziclop Dec 21 '11 at 18:48
1  
The use of method <init> is specified in the Java Virtual Machine Specification (Sections 3.9 and 7.8). Oddly, the specification that it is of type void is squirreled away in Section 4.4.2: "[an instance initialization method] must return no value." –  Ted Hopp Dec 21 '11 at 19:00

Your bytecode is incorrect. Let's step through it:

new #1 <xyzTestes/system/fraction/Fraction>

Stack: Fraction instance (uninitialized, only a pointer to memory)

aload_0

Stack: Fraction (still uninitialized), this

getfield #16 <xyzTestes/system/fraction/Fraction.den>

Stack: Fraction (still uninitialized), this.den

aload_0
getfield #14 <xyzTestes/system/fraction/Fraction.num>

Stack: Fraction (still uninitialized), this.den, this.num

invokespecial #27 <xyzTestes/system/fraction/Fraction.<init>>

Stack:

This is crucial. All invoke methods require the stack to contain this + all arguments. Both this and arguments are taken from the stack. After the invocation only a return value (if any) is placed on the stack. <init> has a void return type.

This means you will call:

areturn

On an empty stack, blowing out the JVM.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.