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#!/usr/bin/python -tt

# A dictionary Of Each New SSID
WirelessNetwork = {}
WirelessNetwork['name'] = 'baz'
WirelessNetwork['type'] = 'bar'
WirelessNetwork['pass'] = 'foo'

# A list of all SSIDs
networkAddList = (WirelessNetwork)

def addWireless(passedDict={}):
  print 'Adding SSID: %s' % passedDict['name']
  print 'Of type: %s' % passedDict['type']
  print 'With Password: %s' % passedDict['pass']

for networkDict in networkAddList:
  addWireless(networkDict)

So I have a List "networkAddList" full of dictionaries ,i.e. "WirelessNetwork". I want to iterate that list "for networkDict in networkAddList" and pass the dictionary itself to my function "addWireless"

When I run the sample code above I get the following error:

TypeError: 'string indices must be integers, not str'

Which makes me think that python thinks passedDict is a string, thus thinking I want string indices i.e. 0 or something rather then the key 'name'. I'm new to python but I am going to have to do this kind of thing a lot so I hope somebody can point me in the right direction as I think its pretty simple. But I can't change the basic idea , i.e. a list of dictionaries.

share|improve this question
    
Don't write "[update: tuple]" Just fix it. The question must stand alone. The history of changes is preserved by StackOverflow. And the history of changes doesn't matter. Just get the question to be correct please. Ignore any historical references. Correct and Complete are useful to others. Change history is not really very useful at all. –  S.Lott Dec 21 '11 at 21:40
    
I see your point, updated the title back to its original. –  acidprime Dec 22 '11 at 5:15
    
Reverting it makes it no longer correct. You're tying to create a tuple of dictionaries. Please fix the question to say 'tuple'. Not '[update : tuple]'. Just tuple, since that's the syntax you're using. Unless the question is "why doesn't () delimit a list?" In which case, ask that. –  S.Lott Dec 22 '11 at 11:36

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

When debugging in python you can confirm your suspicion that the value being passed is a string with the type function:

print type(passedDict)

When you create your tuple with one element, you need a trailing ",". Also note that a tuple is different from a list in python. The primary difference is that tuples are immutable and lists are not.

#!/usr/bin/python -tt

# A dictionary Of Each New SSID
WirelessNetwork = {}
WirelessNetwork['name'] = 'baz'
WirelessNetwork['type'] = 'bar'
WirelessNetwork['pass'] = 'foo'

# A list of all SSIDs
networkAddList = (WirelessNetwork,)

def addWireless(passedDict={}):
  print 'Adding SSID: %s' % passedDict['name']
  print 'Of type: %s' % passedDict['type']
  print 'With Password: %s' % passedDict['pass']

for networkDict in networkAddList:
  addWireless(networkDict)
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks given your concise answer , tips and sample code I decided to chose this as the answer, though I wanted to mention others in the thread came to the same conclusion. Thanks for you help with then syntactical mistake. –  acidprime Dec 21 '11 at 21:34

this is not a list, is the value itself

# A list of all SSIDs
networkAddList = (WirelessNetwork)

with a comma becomes a list

# A list of all SSIDs
networkAddList = (WirelessNetwork,)
share|improve this answer
1  
Well, it's a tuple not a list. Singleton lists ([foo]) work just fine without trailing comma, as do tuples with 2+ elements. –  delnan Dec 21 '11 at 18:45
    
a tuple is an immutable list, but still a list of objects –  fabrizioM Dec 21 '11 at 18:55
    
A tuple is a tuple and not a list. They're both sequences mainly varying by their mutability, but that doesn't make them equivalent. Not even remotely. Of course they may, arguably, be similar enough to be lumped together informally as "lists", but especially here on SO, we should be precise. –  delnan Dec 21 '11 at 18:57
    
A tuple is usually used in sequences where individual items have separate meaning unlike list and they are seldom interchangeable. For ex. you will never use a list to store the coordinates, database records and similarly you will never use tuples to store a list of items. They are there because they have different meanings. –  Abhijit Dec 21 '11 at 19:03

Actually it's not a list, even with a comma. It's a tuple, which is immutable. I bring this up in case your code is wanting to append anything to this later.

networkAddList = [WirelessNetwork] # or, list(WirelessNetwork)
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I actually don't need to mutate so I think I will stick with a tuple –  acidprime Dec 21 '11 at 21:23

[EDITED]

Just ran a quick check of the types being referenced, and I'm believing that you were only missing a serial comma (in WirelessNetwork).

So, your code would look something like this:

networkAddList = (WirelessNetwork,)

Your for loop will then properly iterate over the dictionaries. It was something that was mentioned before, as well. Sorry for any earlier confusion/error!

share|improve this answer
    
Its all wrong. Before at least he was iterating the dictionary and passing at least the keys. Now your code would just be iterating over the keys and pass the individual characters. –  Abhijit Dec 21 '11 at 18:56
    
You're right - it seems that this one wouldn't be a very good solution. Give me about ten minutes to revise it then. –  Makoto Dec 21 '11 at 19:00

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