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Consider the following code snippet:

struct ExceptionBase : virtual std::exception{};
struct SomeSpecificError : virtual ExceptionBase{};
struct SomeOtherError : virtual ExceptionBase{};

void MightThrow();
void HandleException();
void ReportError();

int main()
{
  try
  {
    MightThrow();
  }
  catch( ... )
  {
    HandleException();
  }
}

void MightThrow()
{
  throw SomeSpecificError();
}

void HandleException()
{
  try
  {
    throw;
  }
  catch( ExceptionBase const & )
  {
    // common error processing
  }

  try
  {
    throw;
  }
  catch( SomeSpecificError const & )
  {
    // specific error processing
  }
  catch( SomeOtherError const & )
  {
    // other error processing
  }

  ReportError();
}

void ReportError()
{
}

Section 15.1.4 from the standard tells us:

The memory for the temporary copy of the exception being thrown is allocated in an unspecified way, except as noted in 3.7.3.1. The temporary persists as long as there is a handler being executed for that exception. In particular, if a handler exits by executing a throw; statement, that passes control to another handler for the same exception, so the temporary remains. When the last handler being executed for the exception exits by any means other than throw; the temporary object is destroyed and the implementation may deallocate the memory for the temporary object; any such deallocation is done in an unspecified way. The destruction occurs immediately after the destruction of the object declared in the exception-declaration in the handler.

Am I correct in viewing the handler in main as the "last handler?" And therefore any number of rethrow's and catches are allowed in HandleException without causing the destruction of the current exception object?

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4  
¤ The handler in main is the last one, yes. And yes, you can rethrow and recatch the exception as many times as you want. However, that's not a good idea. Instead let your handler do either (1) pure exception translation, or (2) pure logging and termination. This handler code does not naturally have the knowledge to deal with the failure. Cheer & hth., –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Dec 21 '11 at 21:25
    
@Alf Thanks. It seems that I omitted some important details in my effort to post a small code sample. In actuality, ExceptionBase is derived from boost::exception (from which many common pieces of context data are extracted). Additionally, main is really one of any number of COM methods so the error is logged (with both common and error-specific context data) before returning an appropriate HRESULT code. But either way, you've answered my question. –  Andrew Durward Dec 21 '11 at 21:56

2 Answers 2

Am I correct in viewing the handler in main as the "last handler?"

Yes, you are.

And therefore any number of rethrow's and catches are allowed in HandleException without causing the destruction of the current exception object?

Yes. Exception object that is unhandled finally will be destroyed by the compiler generated code. No memory leaks will be caused.

It's not good to re-throw in HandleException(). Instead 1. write catches to any exception type that requests specific processing; 2. you can group your exception handling using dynamic_cast. Catch the base exception type and try to downcast it to any of its' derived exception classes. BUT dynamic_cast is not good practice. So it's better to use the 1st solution.

It's better to rewrite your code in the following way:

struct ExceptionBase : virtual std::exception{};
struct SomeSpecificError : virtual ExceptionBase{};
struct SomeOtherError : virtual ExceptionBase{};

void MightThrow();
void HandleExceptionBase();

int main()
{
  try
  {
    MightThrow();
  }
  catch (SomeOtherError &error) {
    // first common code
    HandleExceptionBase();
    // react on this exception correctly
    // specific code
  }
  catch (SomeSpecificError &error) {
    // first common code
    HandleExceptionBase();
    // react on this exception correctly
    // specific code
  }
  catch (ExceptionBase &error) {
    HandleExceptionBase();
    // finally catch anything derived from base class
    // react on this exception correctly
  }
  catch(...) {
    // react on any other exception except 3 listed above
  }
}

void MightThrow()
{
  throw SomeSpecificError();
}

void HandleExceptionBase() {
  // base exception handler
}
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Thanks for your response. But unfortunately it doesn't answer the question I've asked. Feel free to edit your answer and I'll be happy to upvote it. Also note that the behaviour of your code is different from the original in that the handler for ExceptionBase would not be executed if either SomeOtherError or SomeSpecificError is caught. –  Andrew Durward Dec 28 '11 at 1:28

Thanks for the comments and answers posted thus far. I haven't seen quite what I'm looking for so I'm going to add some information from an answer provided by aschepler to my follow-up question.

15.3p7: A handler is considered active when initialization is complete for the formal parameter (if any) of the catch clause. ... A handler is no longer considered active when the catch clause exits or when std::unexpected() exits after being entered due to a throw.

15.3p8: The exception with the most recently activated handler that is still active is called the currently handled exception.

I think the language of the standard is quite clear here and that main is in fact the last handler. Therefore the lifetime of an exception is not affected by nested handlers.

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