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// class
class MyClass
{
public:
void doIt() const
{
    cout << "It works!" << endl;
}

void(MyClass::*fPtr)() const;
};

// main

MyClass *t = new MyClass;

// store function address
t->fPtr = &MyClass::doIt;

(*(t->fPtr))(); // Whats wrong with this line?

How can i call the function stored in fPtr? when i try (*(t->fPtr))(); compiler gives those errors :

error C2171: '*' : illegal on operands of type 'void (__thiscall MyClass::* )(void) const

error C2064: term does not evaluate to a function taking 0 arguments

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4  
(t->*(t->fPtr))() i think should work –  KoKuToru Dec 21 '11 at 19:36
    
@KoKuToru: That is wrong as well. –  Nawaz Dec 21 '11 at 19:37
    
@Nawaz it works i tested it. –  KoKuToru Dec 21 '11 at 19:38
    
@KoKuToru: Could you post your comment as an answer? –  ruakh Dec 21 '11 at 19:41
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

(*(t->fPtr))(); is wrong, thre right syntax is ((object)->*(ptrToMember))

means

(t->*(t->fPtr))();

More background info here: http://www.parashift.com/c++-faq-lite/pointers-to-members.html (But better ignore these macros from that page..)

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There is no variable called fPtr in the scope of the main() function. You need to refer to the member variable using -> operator and then dereference pointer-to-member using ->*:

// main

MyClass *t = new MyClass;

// store function adress
t->fPtr = &MyClass::doIt;   

(t->*(t->fPtr))();

Alternatively you can create a local variable and assign the pointer-to-member to it:

// main

MyClass *t = new MyClass;

// store function adress
t->fPtr = &MyClass::doIt;

void (MyClass::*fp)() const = t->fPtr;
(t->*fp)();

The latter makes it clear why the strange-looking construct above is needed. You can also execute a method on an object different from the one whose member variable of pointer-to-member type you use:

MyClass *s = new MyClass;
MyClass *t = new MyClass;

s->fPtr = &MyClass::f;
t->fPtr = &MyClass::g;

(t->*(s->fPtr))(); // Call f() on object *t
(s->*(t->fPtr))(); // Call g() on object *s

The object on the left of -> tells the compiler which object to read the pointer-to-member from while the object on the left of ->* tells the compiler which object to call the member function on.

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