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I have a list of lists with inner lists possibly of variable lengths. I need to sort the outer list based on the alphabetical order of the inner list elements. For example, given a list of

{{0, 0, 7}, {5, 0, 2, 3}, {0, 0, 10, 0}, {0, 6, 2}, {5, 1, 2}, {0, 3, 6, 1, 4}}

I want the output after Sort to be

{{0, 0, 10, 0}, {0, 0, 7}, {0, 3, 6, 1, 4}, {0, 6, 2}, {5, 0, 2, 3}, {5, 1, 2}}

I just do not know how to handle the variable lengths of inner lists in order to write a comparison function. Please help.

Edit

BTW, the original list is a numerical one.

Edit 2

For example, I have a list:

{{0, 0, 7}, {5, 0, 2, 3}, {0, 0, 11, 0}, {0, 0, 1, 12}, {0, 6, 2}, {5, 1, 2}, {0, 3, 6, 1, 4}}

The output should be:

{{0, 0, 1, 12}, {0, 0, 11, 0}, {0, 0, 7}, {0, 3, 6, 1, 4}, {0, 6, 2}, {5, 0, 2, 3}, {5, 1, 2}}

The reason is that 1 is lexically less than 11, which is less than 7.

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@Mr.Wizard: Does my edit 2 address your question? –  Qiang Li Dec 21 '11 at 20:52
    
I think I finally understand; thank you. –  Mr.Wizard Dec 21 '11 at 21:00

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You can set up a lexciographic comparator like this:

lexComp[_, {}] := False;
lexComp[{}, _] := True;
lexComp[{a_, as___}, {b_, bs___}] := a < b || a == b && lexComp[{as}, {bs}];

You can then sort using that to get the desired effect:

Sort[{{0, 0, 7}, {5, 0, 2, 3}, {0, 0, 10, 0}, {0, 6, 2}, {5, 1, 2}, {0, 3, 6, 1, 4}}, lexComp]

{{0, 0, 7}, {0, 0, 10, 0}, {0, 3, 6, 1, 4}, {0, 6, 2}, {5, 0, 2, 3}, {5, 1, 2}}

If you wish to treat the numbers as strings in your sorting, you can modify it like so:

lessAsString[a_, b_] := Order @@ (ToString /@ {a, b}) === 1;

olexComp[_, {}] := False;
olexComp[{}, _] := True;
olexComp[{a_, as___}, {b_, bs___}] := lessAsString[a, b] || a === b && olexComp[{as}, {bs}];

Here is the example of such a sort:

In[5]:= Sort[{{0, 0, 7}, {5, 0, 2, 3}, {0, 0, 11, 0}, {0, 0, 1, 12}, {0, 6, 2}, {5, 1, 2}, {0, 3, 6, 1, 4}}, olexComp]

Out[5]= {{0, 0, 1, 12}, {0, 0, 11, 0}, {0, 0, 7}, {0, 3, 6, 1, 4}, {0, 6, 2}, {5, 0, 2, 3}, {5, 1, 2}}
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shouldn't {0, 0, 10, 0} precedes {0, 0, 7}? –  Qiang Li Dec 21 '11 at 20:17
    
@QiangLi: If you want each number treated as text, then yes. Is this what you desire? –  Sebastian Paaske Tørholm Dec 21 '11 at 20:20
    
yes, treat each number as a string –  Qiang Li Dec 21 '11 at 20:21
1  
@Sebastian I was just playing around with Sort[list,p] like your example. Looks like there is some weirdness with Mathematica's sorting behavior on Strings -- try Ordering[{"{1,11,2}", "{1,1,2}"}] and Ordering[{"{1,11}", "{1,1}"}] -- they are not the same. @Qiang -- if you want more complicated lexical ordering, use Sebastian's example example as a template. –  cah Dec 21 '11 at 20:24
2  
choose as correct answer since it shows how to customize the comparator so that I can use it in other cases. –  Qiang Li Dec 21 '11 at 21:43
alphaSort = #[[ Ordering @ Map[ToString, PadRight@#, {2}] ]] &;

This works by preparing the data for the default Ordering sort, and then using that order to sort the original list.

In this case, padding all of the lists to the same length keeps this Sort property from interfering:

Sort usually orders expressions by putting shorter ones first, and then comparing parts in a depth-first manner.

ToString is used to get an alphabetical order rather than a numeric one.

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I see your point. Yes, it seems to work. –  Qiang Li Dec 21 '11 at 21:15
1  
here it goes. Thank you! :) –  Qiang Li Dec 21 '11 at 21:41

This should do it

{{0, 0, 7}, {5, 0, 2, 3}, {0, 0, 10, 0}, {0, 6, 2}, {5, 1, 2}, {0, 3, 
   6, 1, 4}} // SortBy[#, ToString] &

This works because lexically, comma and space precede the numbers, so {a,b} is lexically before {a,b,c}.

share|improve this answer
    
I see. I was initially thinking along the line of Sort, first directly using ToString, in this case wrong, I need Apply[StringJoin, Map[#, ToString]]&... And I was stuck. So what is good about SortBy not shared by Sort? –  Qiang Li Dec 21 '11 at 20:07
    
@Qiang Li -- SortBy lets you sort a list without transforming it. As an alternative you could call ToString on each element of your list, sort the resulting strings, and then call ToExpression on each element of the sorted list to recover the vectors of Integers. That's much less efficient. Another method would be call ToString on each element of your list, then call Ordering on the resulting list, and use Take to permute the original list to sorted order. I use this trick a lot to generate and cache permutations without copying the original list(s). –  cah Dec 21 '11 at 20:09
    
actually your answer is wrong! try this example: {{0, 0, 7}, {5, 0, 2, 3}, {0, 0, 11, 0}, {0, 0, 1, 12}, {0, 6, 2}, {5, 1, 2}, {0, 3, 6, 1, 4}}. Here I expect {0, 0, 1, 12} to precede {0, 0, 11, 0} –  Qiang Li Dec 21 '11 at 20:12

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